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Engaging non‐indigenous students in indigenous history and “un‐history” An approach for non‐indigenous teachers and a politics for the twenty‐first century

Engaging non‐indigenous students in indigenous history and “un‐history” An approach for... Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to analyse non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history and to improve non‐indigenous students’ engagement with indigenous history. Design/methodology – The paper, based on praxis, is a theoretical discussion of the reasons for non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history. Findings – The paper argues that non‐indigenous imaginings of national self creates indigenous history into a “un‐history” (a history that could not be). The paper suggests non‐indigenous teachers of indigenous history may undertake a broader perspective to prepare students for indigenous history, including fostering a critical appreciation of histiography, Australian colonial art, literature and popular culture, to enable a critical understanding of the national imagining of Australians (as non‐indigenous) in order to enable engagement with indigenous history. Research limitations/implications – The paper's focus and findings do not presume relevance to indigenous educators of indigenous history, as previous research has shown non‐indigenous students’ reactions to an indigenous educator may differ from an to a non‐indigenous educator. Originality/value – The paper moves beyond discussions about content of indigenous history to issues of resistance and engagement found amongst non‐indigenous students with regard to indigenous history. The paper suggests a twenty‐first century political approach where there is non‐indigenous ownership of the shared history in (indigenous) Australia history, enabling indigenous history to move from the periphery to the centre of Australian colonial history. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Engaging non‐indigenous students in indigenous history and “un‐history” An approach for non‐indigenous teachers and a politics for the twenty‐first century

History of Education Review , Volume 41 (2): 15 – Oct 12, 2012

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/08198691211269539
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to analyse non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history and to improve non‐indigenous students’ engagement with indigenous history. Design/methodology – The paper, based on praxis, is a theoretical discussion of the reasons for non‐indigenous student resistance to indigenous history. Findings – The paper argues that non‐indigenous imaginings of national self creates indigenous history into a “un‐history” (a history that could not be). The paper suggests non‐indigenous teachers of indigenous history may undertake a broader perspective to prepare students for indigenous history, including fostering a critical appreciation of histiography, Australian colonial art, literature and popular culture, to enable a critical understanding of the national imagining of Australians (as non‐indigenous) in order to enable engagement with indigenous history. Research limitations/implications – The paper's focus and findings do not presume relevance to indigenous educators of indigenous history, as previous research has shown non‐indigenous students’ reactions to an indigenous educator may differ from an to a non‐indigenous educator. Originality/value – The paper moves beyond discussions about content of indigenous history to issues of resistance and engagement found amongst non‐indigenous students with regard to indigenous history. The paper suggests a twenty‐first century political approach where there is non‐indigenous ownership of the shared history in (indigenous) Australia history, enabling indigenous history to move from the periphery to the centre of Australian colonial history.

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 12, 2012

Keywords: Australia; Universities; History; Indigenous history; Australian legend; Unhistory; National identity; Historiography; History teaching; Non‐indigenous pedagogy; Controversial history

References