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Energy provision in a changing world Is nuclear the best way forward?

Energy provision in a changing world Is nuclear the best way forward? Purpose – This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies. Design/methodology/approach – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Findings – The paper finds that increasing concerns about the effects of climate change have accelerated the search for less harmful energy sources. One of the outcomes has been renewed consideration of nuclear power as a serious alternative to fossil fuels. Shortage in the supplies of gas and oil has increased the appeal in some quarters. In every decade since the 1970s, nuclear energy has been the fastest growing major source of electricity. It produces 30 percent of the power used by the European Union (EU), with France taking over three‐fourths of its electricity supply from nuclear reactors. Nuclear also generates 20 percent of US energy, despite the country's recognized partiality to oil. Not surprisingly, however, this form of energy still struggles to gain universal approval and the mere mention of the “N” word still sends shivers down many spines. Practical implications – The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. Originality/value – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Strategic Direction Emerald Publishing

Energy provision in a changing world Is nuclear the best way forward?

Strategic Direction , Volume 24 (6): 4 – Apr 18, 2008

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References (4)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0258-0543
DOI
10.1108/02580540810868050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies. Design/methodology/approach – This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context. Findings – The paper finds that increasing concerns about the effects of climate change have accelerated the search for less harmful energy sources. One of the outcomes has been renewed consideration of nuclear power as a serious alternative to fossil fuels. Shortage in the supplies of gas and oil has increased the appeal in some quarters. In every decade since the 1970s, nuclear energy has been the fastest growing major source of electricity. It produces 30 percent of the power used by the European Union (EU), with France taking over three‐fourths of its electricity supply from nuclear reactors. Nuclear also generates 20 percent of US energy, despite the country's recognized partiality to oil. Not surprisingly, however, this form of energy still struggles to gain universal approval and the mere mention of the “N” word still sends shivers down many spines. Practical implications – The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations. Originality/value – The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Journal

Strategic DirectionEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 18, 2008

Keywords: Nuclear power; Energy sources; Nuclear safety; Capital investment

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