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Electronic theses: the turning point

Electronic theses: the turning point Purpose – To describe the key findings of the UK JISC‐funded Electronic Theses project that was led by The Robert Gordon University, as well as the results of associated projects that formed part of the JISC‐funded “FAIR” programme, and the way in which the recommendations will be taken forward. Design/methodology/approach – The research involved: an assessment of existing best practice relating to the production, management and use of e‐theses; the use of questionnaires to obtain feedback from potential users; the identification and testing of potentially useful software; consideration of the elements required in a metadata core set, and discussions with representative bodies to ensure that the model recommended for use in the UK had support from the key stakeholders. Findings – Information is provided about the value of the NDLTD web site, the suitability of DSpace and EPrints software for institutional e‐theses repositories, and the recommended infrastructure for the operation of an e‐theses service at national level. Details are included about the agreed metadata core set for UK e‐theses, and advice is provided about administrative, legal and cultural issues. Practical implications – The JISC‐funded EThOS project is taking forward many of the recommendations from the Electronic Theses project. Originality/value – The research results described in this paper will be of use to institutions, which are aiming to establish their own e‐theses collections. The details provided about the UK approach towards the management of e‐theses may be of use in countries, which have not yet made their theses available in electronic format. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Program: electronic library and information systems Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0033-0337
DOI
10.1108/00330330510610546
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To describe the key findings of the UK JISC‐funded Electronic Theses project that was led by The Robert Gordon University, as well as the results of associated projects that formed part of the JISC‐funded “FAIR” programme, and the way in which the recommendations will be taken forward. Design/methodology/approach – The research involved: an assessment of existing best practice relating to the production, management and use of e‐theses; the use of questionnaires to obtain feedback from potential users; the identification and testing of potentially useful software; consideration of the elements required in a metadata core set, and discussions with representative bodies to ensure that the model recommended for use in the UK had support from the key stakeholders. Findings – Information is provided about the value of the NDLTD web site, the suitability of DSpace and EPrints software for institutional e‐theses repositories, and the recommended infrastructure for the operation of an e‐theses service at national level. Details are included about the agreed metadata core set for UK e‐theses, and advice is provided about administrative, legal and cultural issues. Practical implications – The JISC‐funded EThOS project is taking forward many of the recommendations from the Electronic Theses project. Originality/value – The research results described in this paper will be of use to institutions, which are aiming to establish their own e‐theses collections. The details provided about the UK approach towards the management of e‐theses may be of use in countries, which have not yet made their theses available in electronic format.

Journal

Program: electronic library and information systemsEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2005

Keywords: Theses; Best practice; Higher education; United Kingdom; Electronic publishing

References