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Electrical Heating System Improves Quality and Cuts Production Wait Time Losses

Electrical Heating System Improves Quality and Cuts Production Wait Time Losses mould before placing it in the press. The design selected, Heatwave TWIG made by Force Engineering of Shepshed, Electrical Heating Leicestershire, uses a novel induction heating method to generate heat within the metal structure of the mould. Using System Improves this TWIG technique most of Dowty's moulds can be heated to operating temperatures in less than 90 seconds. Quality and Cuts This has reduced wait times considerably and guarantees the cure condition of all parts. Production Wait Time More than half the moulds used by Dowty Seals were heated to operating temperatures high enough for immediate Losses use, while the remainder needed one cycle of the press to stabilise to the correct temperature. Overall, the wait time was cut from 13.5 minutes to 2.3 A new method of electrical induction eratures around 170°C. Temperature minutes; an average reduction of 82 per heating saved Dowty Seals more than control is critical to maintain the high cent. £9,000 each year by improving the standards required in seal performance. The total savings generated by the utilisation of production presses at their Before the seals could be produced the new method were more than £9,000 Tewkesbury manufacturing plant. The mould had to be heated on the each year in terms of increased total new equipment, introduced with the production press. This normally required output and better utilisation of the help of Midlands Electricity plc, achieved around three cycles of the press resulting presses. This enabled Dowty Seals to these savings by reducing the wait times in a wait of over 13 minutes before recoup the capital investment of £8,662 for heating moulds by more than 82 per effective operating temperatures were in just under 12 months. cent. reached, and gave rise to uncertainty in the cure condition of the first parts from Midlands Electricity plc, Service Dowty Seals mould plastic and the run. To Industry, Mucklow Hill, Hales­ rubber compounds into high performance owen, West Midlands B62 8BP. Tel: seals designed to operate in hostile 021 423 2345. environments in aerospace and automo­ Trials tive systems. After trials in consultation with Dowt y Seals Ltd, Ashchurch, The seals are produced using multi- Midlands Electricity plc, TWIG (Travel­ Tewkesbury, Glos GL20 8JS. Tel: impression moulds which are usually ling Wave Induction Generator) mould 0684 299111. heated on the moulding press to temp­ pre-heaters were introduced to heat the Stay Cool on a Jumbo Job AIRCRAFT engineers need to keep a cool head at all times and maintaining wide-bodied passenger aircraft such as McDonnell Douglas DC 10s, at Hangar 5, Gatwick Airport can be hot work. Heatbusters, a division of W.C. Youngman Ltd., supplied British Air­ ways with four 'MovinCool', portable SF15 air conditioners to help engineers work in a comfortable environment. The air conditioners counter the heat generated when electrical equipment and flight computers are tested during on-going maintenance checks, which take place all year round. Three SF15s are positioned adjacent to the aircraft flight deck and their ten foot long directional 'cooling arms' target cool air on engineers carrying out delicate technical adjustments in a confined area. The other SF15 keeps engineers working at the rear of the aircraft cool. W. C. Youngman Ltd Stane Street, Slinfold, West Sussex RH13 7RD Tel: 0403 790456. 16 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING —Marc h 1991 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Electrical Heating System Improves Quality and Cuts Production Wait Time Losses

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 63 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1991

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb037068
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

mould before placing it in the press. The design selected, Heatwave TWIG made by Force Engineering of Shepshed, Electrical Heating Leicestershire, uses a novel induction heating method to generate heat within the metal structure of the mould. Using System Improves this TWIG technique most of Dowty's moulds can be heated to operating temperatures in less than 90 seconds. Quality and Cuts This has reduced wait times considerably and guarantees the cure condition of all parts. Production Wait Time More than half the moulds used by Dowty Seals were heated to operating temperatures high enough for immediate Losses use, while the remainder needed one cycle of the press to stabilise to the correct temperature. Overall, the wait time was cut from 13.5 minutes to 2.3 A new method of electrical induction eratures around 170°C. Temperature minutes; an average reduction of 82 per heating saved Dowty Seals more than control is critical to maintain the high cent. £9,000 each year by improving the standards required in seal performance. The total savings generated by the utilisation of production presses at their Before the seals could be produced the new method were more than £9,000 Tewkesbury manufacturing plant. The mould had to be heated on the each year in terms of increased total new equipment, introduced with the production press. This normally required output and better utilisation of the help of Midlands Electricity plc, achieved around three cycles of the press resulting presses. This enabled Dowty Seals to these savings by reducing the wait times in a wait of over 13 minutes before recoup the capital investment of £8,662 for heating moulds by more than 82 per effective operating temperatures were in just under 12 months. cent. reached, and gave rise to uncertainty in the cure condition of the first parts from Midlands Electricity plc, Service Dowty Seals mould plastic and the run. To Industry, Mucklow Hill, Hales­ rubber compounds into high performance owen, West Midlands B62 8BP. Tel: seals designed to operate in hostile 021 423 2345. environments in aerospace and automo­ Trials tive systems. After trials in consultation with Dowt y Seals Ltd, Ashchurch, The seals are produced using multi- Midlands Electricity plc, TWIG (Travel­ Tewkesbury, Glos GL20 8JS. Tel: impression moulds which are usually ling Wave Induction Generator) mould 0684 299111. heated on the moulding press to temp­ pre-heaters were introduced to heat the Stay Cool on a Jumbo Job AIRCRAFT engineers need to keep a cool head at all times and maintaining wide-bodied passenger aircraft such as McDonnell Douglas DC 10s, at Hangar 5, Gatwick Airport can be hot work. Heatbusters, a division of W.C. Youngman Ltd., supplied British Air­ ways with four 'MovinCool', portable SF15 air conditioners to help engineers work in a comfortable environment. The air conditioners counter the heat generated when electrical equipment and flight computers are tested during on-going maintenance checks, which take place all year round. Three SF15s are positioned adjacent to the aircraft flight deck and their ten foot long directional 'cooling arms' target cool air on engineers carrying out delicate technical adjustments in a confined area. The other SF15 keeps engineers working at the rear of the aircraft cool. W. C. Youngman Ltd Stane Street, Slinfold, West Sussex RH13 7RD Tel: 0403 790456. 16 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING —Marc h 1991

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1991

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