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Effects of water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling on the properties of wood‐polypropylene composites containing pigments

Effects of water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling on the properties of wood‐polypropylene composites... Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of water immersion‐freeze‐thaw treatment on the physical properties, flexural strength (FS) and morphology of wood‐polypropylene composites containing pigments. Design/methodology/approach – Wood‐polypropylene composites containing brown, green and grey pigments were compounded in a conical twin‐screw extruder. A composite manufactured without any pigment addition was used as a reference. The amount of pelletized wood, polypropylene and coupling agent (MAPP) was kept constant. The moisture content, thickness swelling (TS), FS and surface colour of the composites were measured before and after water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the composites. Findings – FS and dimensional stability were reduced after exposure to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling for all composites. The surface properties (colour and roughness) of the composites also changed after exposure to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling. The degree of change depended on the presence of pigment and the type of polypropylene (neat or recycled), however. Research limitations/implications – This study is a part of an ongoing study on weathering of wood‐polymer composites (WPC) containing different additives. The results of this study were obtained from accelerated laboratory experiments. Practical implications – Inorganic pigments are widely used as additives in plastics, because they have an excellent UV absorption, good IR‐reflective properties and heat stability. The research revealed that metal‐containing pigments had an effect on degradation in quality of wood‐polypropylene composites exposed to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cyclic treatment. The addition of metal‐containing pigments to composite formulation resulted in a higher susceptibility of wood‐polypropylene composites to water absorption, and as a consequence to a higher drop of FS compared to composites made without pigment. The polymer matrix plays an important role in the protection of WPC against weathering. Originality/value – This paper will help in understanding possible problems in the durability of wood‐polypropylene composites compounded with metal‐based pigments when they are exposed to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cyclic treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pigment & Resin Technology Emerald Publishing

Effects of water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling on the properties of wood‐polypropylene composites containing pigments

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0369-9420
DOI
10.1108/03699421111180536
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of water immersion‐freeze‐thaw treatment on the physical properties, flexural strength (FS) and morphology of wood‐polypropylene composites containing pigments. Design/methodology/approach – Wood‐polypropylene composites containing brown, green and grey pigments were compounded in a conical twin‐screw extruder. A composite manufactured without any pigment addition was used as a reference. The amount of pelletized wood, polypropylene and coupling agent (MAPP) was kept constant. The moisture content, thickness swelling (TS), FS and surface colour of the composites were measured before and after water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the composites. Findings – FS and dimensional stability were reduced after exposure to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling for all composites. The surface properties (colour and roughness) of the composites also changed after exposure to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cycling. The degree of change depended on the presence of pigment and the type of polypropylene (neat or recycled), however. Research limitations/implications – This study is a part of an ongoing study on weathering of wood‐polymer composites (WPC) containing different additives. The results of this study were obtained from accelerated laboratory experiments. Practical implications – Inorganic pigments are widely used as additives in plastics, because they have an excellent UV absorption, good IR‐reflective properties and heat stability. The research revealed that metal‐containing pigments had an effect on degradation in quality of wood‐polypropylene composites exposed to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cyclic treatment. The addition of metal‐containing pigments to composite formulation resulted in a higher susceptibility of wood‐polypropylene composites to water absorption, and as a consequence to a higher drop of FS compared to composites made without pigment. The polymer matrix plays an important role in the protection of WPC against weathering. Originality/value – This paper will help in understanding possible problems in the durability of wood‐polypropylene composites compounded with metal‐based pigments when they are exposed to water immersion‐freeze‐thaw cyclic treatment.

Journal

Pigment & Resin TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 8, 2011

Keywords: Physical properties of materials; Pigments; Wood‐polymer composites; Residual flexural strength; Colour change; Polypropylene; Thickness swelling

References