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Effects of sulphur in diesel fuel

Effects of sulphur in diesel fuel Organic acids result from incomplete and "chilled" ONE of the problems which have to he solved in combustion whilst inorganic acids are formed from the immediate future concerns the increasing the sulphur contained in the diesel fuel. Sulphuric percentage of sulphur present in diesel fuel oil. A acid is formed and tends to react with unsaturated paper recently presented to the Diesel Engine Users hydrocarbons removing them as an acid sludge. Association by C. G. Williams, D.Sc., M.I.Mech.E., This leads to deposits on pistons and sludge in crank F.R.Ae.S., F.Inst.Pet. and A. Wilson, M.Eng., cases. The piston deposits form into hard, abrasive A.M.I.Mech.E., A.M.Inst.Pet. is therefore of interest. carbon and thus increase the abrasive wear. The paper was entitled " Diesel Fuel Research at Thornton Research Centre " and referred, inter alia, Effect of Jacket Temperature. to the ill effects of sulphur in fuel oil and the efforts The removal of sulphur from diesel fuel is not being made to counteract them. economically possible, but there are effective counter- measures. If condensation can be prevented, by Causes of Cylinder Wear. maintaining high wall temperatures, deleterious The authors stated that cylinder wear may be due effects will be alleviated. Tests carried out at to a combination of abrasion, attrition and corrosion. Thornton with a 1.5% sulphur fuel showed that wear Attritious wear, a mild form of scuffing, is most rates assumed serious proportions at the lower jacket serious at the upper end of the ring travel on the temperatures. The graph illustrates this. The skin firing stroke and particularly at high loading and temperature in the region of the upper ring travel should be maintained between 100°C. and 150°C. In order to maintain these temperatures, jacket cooling water must be controlled and pre-warming of the jackets is advised before starting from cold. Temper­ atures of over 150°C. will give rise to heavy carbon and lacquer formations. Chrom e Liners and Fuel Additives. Other effective measures include chromium plating of liners, additives in the fuel and additives in the lubricating oil. In connection with the use of chrome liners, using the "porous" type of plating in a small high speed engine and operating at optimum jacket temperatures on a 1.5% sulphur fuel, it has been found that bore wear has been reduced to about one third that of an unplated liner, although there was no reduction in ring wear. The possibility of reducing cylinder wear by use of additives in fuel has received attention. The addition of certain petroleum soluble basic metallo-organic salts to a 1.5% sulphur fuel has been effective, but the authors stated that wear has not been reduced sufficiently to justify the cost. There is also the objection of inorganic ash deposit in the combustion chamber. Additive Lubricating Oils. The most attractive method of combating cylinder wear is to use additive lubricating oils. In the low speeds when the supply of lubricant to the development of the new additives special attention cylinder walls tends to be inadequate. has been directed towards this aspect of corrosive Corrosive wear is due to acid condensation and wear. tends to occur at the upper end of the ring travel. Scientific LUBRICATION 6 March, 1949 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Effects of sulphur in diesel fuel

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 1 (3): 1 – Mar 1, 1949

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb051990
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Organic acids result from incomplete and "chilled" ONE of the problems which have to he solved in combustion whilst inorganic acids are formed from the immediate future concerns the increasing the sulphur contained in the diesel fuel. Sulphuric percentage of sulphur present in diesel fuel oil. A acid is formed and tends to react with unsaturated paper recently presented to the Diesel Engine Users hydrocarbons removing them as an acid sludge. Association by C. G. Williams, D.Sc., M.I.Mech.E., This leads to deposits on pistons and sludge in crank F.R.Ae.S., F.Inst.Pet. and A. Wilson, M.Eng., cases. The piston deposits form into hard, abrasive A.M.I.Mech.E., A.M.Inst.Pet. is therefore of interest. carbon and thus increase the abrasive wear. The paper was entitled " Diesel Fuel Research at Thornton Research Centre " and referred, inter alia, Effect of Jacket Temperature. to the ill effects of sulphur in fuel oil and the efforts The removal of sulphur from diesel fuel is not being made to counteract them. economically possible, but there are effective counter- measures. If condensation can be prevented, by Causes of Cylinder Wear. maintaining high wall temperatures, deleterious The authors stated that cylinder wear may be due effects will be alleviated. Tests carried out at to a combination of abrasion, attrition and corrosion. Thornton with a 1.5% sulphur fuel showed that wear Attritious wear, a mild form of scuffing, is most rates assumed serious proportions at the lower jacket serious at the upper end of the ring travel on the temperatures. The graph illustrates this. The skin firing stroke and particularly at high loading and temperature in the region of the upper ring travel should be maintained between 100°C. and 150°C. In order to maintain these temperatures, jacket cooling water must be controlled and pre-warming of the jackets is advised before starting from cold. Temper­ atures of over 150°C. will give rise to heavy carbon and lacquer formations. Chrom e Liners and Fuel Additives. Other effective measures include chromium plating of liners, additives in the fuel and additives in the lubricating oil. In connection with the use of chrome liners, using the "porous" type of plating in a small high speed engine and operating at optimum jacket temperatures on a 1.5% sulphur fuel, it has been found that bore wear has been reduced to about one third that of an unplated liner, although there was no reduction in ring wear. The possibility of reducing cylinder wear by use of additives in fuel has received attention. The addition of certain petroleum soluble basic metallo-organic salts to a 1.5% sulphur fuel has been effective, but the authors stated that wear has not been reduced sufficiently to justify the cost. There is also the objection of inorganic ash deposit in the combustion chamber. Additive Lubricating Oils. The most attractive method of combating cylinder wear is to use additive lubricating oils. In the low speeds when the supply of lubricant to the development of the new additives special attention cylinder walls tends to be inadequate. has been directed towards this aspect of corrosive Corrosive wear is due to acid condensation and wear. tends to occur at the upper end of the ring travel. Scientific LUBRICATION 6 March, 1949

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1949

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