Effects of LMS, self‐efficacy, and self‐regulated learning on LMS effectiveness in business education

Effects of LMS, self‐efficacy, and self‐regulated learning on LMS effectiveness in business... Purpose – The majority of e‐learning empirical research studies have focused on the two research streams: outcome comparison studies with classroom‐based learning and studies examining potential predictors of e‐learning success. The determinants of e‐learning success include interactions, instructor support and mentoring, information delivery technology, course content, self‐motivation, learning styles, and course structure. Most of these empirical studies failed to include the technological dimension as an antecedent of effectiveness of e‐learning systems. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the effects of e‐learning management systems (LMS), self‐efficacy and self‐regulated learning on learner satisfaction and system effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach – This research model is an extension of the information systems success model of DeLone and McLean and the virtual learning environment effectiveness model of Piccoli et al. The research model was tested using the structural equation modelling‐based Partial Least Squares (PLS) methodology. Findings – First, use of e‐LMS is not positively related to systems quality, information quality, self‐managed learning, and user satisfaction. Second, the findings strongly support the previous works of Rai, et al. , Livari, and Freeze, et al. These three studies found strong positive relationships between information quality and user‐satisfaction and between systems quality and user‐satisfaction in a voluntary or mandatory use context. Third, perceived user satisfaction with e‐LMS is a very strong predictor of system effectiveness. This is in accordance with the findings and conclusions discussed in the literature on student satisfaction (Freeze et al. , Eom et al. , Rai et al. , Livari). Of the four factors hypothesized to affect user satisfaction with e‐LMS, only two (systems quality and information quality) are supported at p <0.01. Practical implications – This paper provides empirical evidence to support that e‐learner satisfaction is an important predictor of e‐LMS effectiveness and that systems quality and information quality have significant direct impacts on the perceived satisfaction of e‐learners with e‐LMS. Originality/value – This study provides new empirical evidence that e‐learners' self‐regulated learning behavior may not lead to a higher level of e‐learners' satisfaction with e‐LMS, but it may lead to a higher level of satisfaction with web‐based courses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of International Education in Business Emerald Publishing

Effects of LMS, self‐efficacy, and self‐regulated learning on LMS effectiveness in business education

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
2046-469X
DOI
10.1108/18363261211281744
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The majority of e‐learning empirical research studies have focused on the two research streams: outcome comparison studies with classroom‐based learning and studies examining potential predictors of e‐learning success. The determinants of e‐learning success include interactions, instructor support and mentoring, information delivery technology, course content, self‐motivation, learning styles, and course structure. Most of these empirical studies failed to include the technological dimension as an antecedent of effectiveness of e‐learning systems. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the effects of e‐learning management systems (LMS), self‐efficacy and self‐regulated learning on learner satisfaction and system effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach – This research model is an extension of the information systems success model of DeLone and McLean and the virtual learning environment effectiveness model of Piccoli et al. The research model was tested using the structural equation modelling‐based Partial Least Squares (PLS) methodology. Findings – First, use of e‐LMS is not positively related to systems quality, information quality, self‐managed learning, and user satisfaction. Second, the findings strongly support the previous works of Rai, et al. , Livari, and Freeze, et al. These three studies found strong positive relationships between information quality and user‐satisfaction and between systems quality and user‐satisfaction in a voluntary or mandatory use context. Third, perceived user satisfaction with e‐LMS is a very strong predictor of system effectiveness. This is in accordance with the findings and conclusions discussed in the literature on student satisfaction (Freeze et al. , Eom et al. , Rai et al. , Livari). Of the four factors hypothesized to affect user satisfaction with e‐LMS, only two (systems quality and information quality) are supported at p <0.01. Practical implications – This paper provides empirical evidence to support that e‐learner satisfaction is an important predictor of e‐LMS effectiveness and that systems quality and information quality have significant direct impacts on the perceived satisfaction of e‐learners with e‐LMS. Originality/value – This study provides new empirical evidence that e‐learners' self‐regulated learning behavior may not lead to a higher level of e‐learners' satisfaction with e‐LMS, but it may lead to a higher level of satisfaction with web‐based courses.

Journal

Journal of International Education in BusinessEmerald Publishing

Published: Nov 2, 2012

Keywords: Distance learning; Learning management systems (LMS); User‐satisfaction; Self‐managed learning; Self‐efficacy; Online learning

References

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