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Effect of EXHAUST SMOKE on lubricant performance

Effect of EXHAUST SMOKE on lubricant performance In his paper A Study of Factors Affecting Diesel Lubricant Performance, read before the SAE Annual Meeting at Detroit in January, H. C. Morris of the Texas Company, included some interesting remarks concerning the effect of exhaust smoke on lubricant performance. After stating that the basic factors controlling exhaust smoke were a engine design, b type of fuel used, c correctness of fuel injection and d degree of engine maintenance, Mr. Morris stated that in some operations smoke does occur in spite of all precautions and creates a condition with which the lubricant must cope. An intensive investigation had been carried out on the effect of exhaust smoke on lubricant performance as judged by engine deposits and condition of the used oil. A significant part of this work was the measurement of piston temperature as a function of fuel air ratio. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial Lubrication and Tribology Emerald Publishing

Effect of EXHAUST SMOKE on lubricant performance

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology , Volume 4 (2): 2 – Feb 1, 1952

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0036-8792
DOI
10.1108/eb052154
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In his paper A Study of Factors Affecting Diesel Lubricant Performance, read before the SAE Annual Meeting at Detroit in January, H. C. Morris of the Texas Company, included some interesting remarks concerning the effect of exhaust smoke on lubricant performance. After stating that the basic factors controlling exhaust smoke were a engine design, b type of fuel used, c correctness of fuel injection and d degree of engine maintenance, Mr. Morris stated that in some operations smoke does occur in spite of all precautions and creates a condition with which the lubricant must cope. An intensive investigation had been carried out on the effect of exhaust smoke on lubricant performance as judged by engine deposits and condition of the used oil. A significant part of this work was the measurement of piston temperature as a function of fuel air ratio.

Journal

Industrial Lubrication and TribologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1952

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