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Effect of acha ( Digitaria exilis staph ) and millet ( Pennisetum typhodium ) grain on kunun zaki

Effect of acha ( Digitaria exilis staph ) and millet ( Pennisetum typhodium ) grain on kunun zaki Acha and millet were cleaned, steeped in water, washed and spiced. Dry, granulated sweet potato was added and wet milled to produce a slurry. Two‐thirds of the slurry were gelatinized by the addition of boiled water and allowed to stand for two hours before the temperature was dropped to 50°C. The third part of the fresh slurry was added, mixed and allowed to stand for 12 hours, filtered through a cloth and sweetened by sucrose to produce kunun zaki . The effect of the two grains on the physiochemical properties (viscosity, total soluble solids, total solids, acidity, protein, fat, ash, moisture, carbohydrate and specific density) and sensory (colour, taste, odour, texture) quality were assessed. The physiochemical properties of the two grains were relatively similar. The mean scores for the flavour (odour and taste) are significantly different ( P ≤ 0.05) with the acha based kunun zaki being more acceptable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

Effect of acha ( Digitaria exilis staph ) and millet ( Pennisetum typhodium ) grain on kunun zaki

British Food Journal , Volume 106 (7): 8 – Jul 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/00070700410545719
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acha and millet were cleaned, steeped in water, washed and spiced. Dry, granulated sweet potato was added and wet milled to produce a slurry. Two‐thirds of the slurry were gelatinized by the addition of boiled water and allowed to stand for two hours before the temperature was dropped to 50°C. The third part of the fresh slurry was added, mixed and allowed to stand for 12 hours, filtered through a cloth and sweetened by sucrose to produce kunun zaki . The effect of the two grains on the physiochemical properties (viscosity, total soluble solids, total solids, acidity, protein, fat, ash, moisture, carbohydrate and specific density) and sensory (colour, taste, odour, texture) quality were assessed. The physiochemical properties of the two grains were relatively similar. The mean scores for the flavour (odour and taste) are significantly different ( P ≤ 0.05) with the acha based kunun zaki being more acceptable.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 2004

Keywords: Cereal foods; Project evaluation; Agricultural products; Agriculture; Food technology; Nigeria

References