Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Edwin F. Gay, Arch W. Shaw, and the uses of history in early graduate business education

Edwin F. Gay, Arch W. Shaw, and the uses of history in early graduate business education Notes that the collaboration between Edwin F. Gay, founding dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, and Arch W. Shaw, a Chicago publisher, exemplifies the significance of historical sensibility on the origins of US management studies. Points out that the attention they gave to historical methods and data as tools of inquiry reflected Gay’s professional training in economic history, but it also reflected the sense both men had of the significance of institutions and institutional patterns in business life. Both men also urged more attention to distribution as a serious topic for academic research and teaching, and also recognized co‐ordinating activity as a central function of modern management. Adds that the potential gains from scale economies depended on how well general managers filled this function, and that for this task managers required an outlook that transcended technical expertise. Suggests that they had to understand the broader institutional setting in which they managed and that historical awareness could illuminate that context. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Management History (Archive) Emerald Publishing

Edwin F. Gay, Arch W. Shaw, and the uses of history in early graduate business education

Journal of Management History (Archive) , Volume 2 (3): 17 – Sep 1, 1996

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/edwin-f-gay-arch-w-shaw-and-the-uses-of-history-in-early-graduate-J5ERSj2cVH
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1355-252X
DOI
10.1108/13552529610127687
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Notes that the collaboration between Edwin F. Gay, founding dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, and Arch W. Shaw, a Chicago publisher, exemplifies the significance of historical sensibility on the origins of US management studies. Points out that the attention they gave to historical methods and data as tools of inquiry reflected Gay’s professional training in economic history, but it also reflected the sense both men had of the significance of institutions and institutional patterns in business life. Both men also urged more attention to distribution as a serious topic for academic research and teaching, and also recognized co‐ordinating activity as a central function of modern management. Adds that the potential gains from scale economies depended on how well general managers filled this function, and that for this task managers required an outlook that transcended technical expertise. Suggests that they had to understand the broader institutional setting in which they managed and that historical awareness could illuminate that context.

Journal

Journal of Management History (Archive)Emerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1996

Keywords: Business history; Business schools; Management education; Methods; USA

There are no references for this article.