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Educational Reform and Environmental Concern: A History of School Nature Study in Australia

Educational Reform and Environmental Concern: A History of School Nature Study in Australia inroads of mass schooling programmes but was an ongoing battle about gender and the Book reviews politics of patriarchy concerning who controlled these institutions – men or women? Whitehead’s book resounds with battles won and battles lost. But there is more for the reader to appraise. Whitehead positions her book as a “transnational history”, a relatively new discourse that allows Whitehead and other adherents to “encapsulate the transnational flow of ideas” that are evident in de Lissa’s own story but in the broader politics played out in the book. This approach is particularly useful for portraying the nuances of the imperial networks that are the backdrop to this age and de Lissa’sstory as a “British” colonial. Whitehead also gives presence and visibility to the lives and views of de Lissa’sgraduatesinbothSouth Australia and England. The archival detective work must have been enormous. As a pivotal generation, their lives are a window onto changing gender codes and the burgeoning opportunities (and its challenges) for young women choosing careers in early years education. De Lissa urged her students to be “makers of society”. Again, there is much that resonates to those of us working in early childhood teacher education, albeit now mainly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Educational Reform and Environmental Concern: A History of School Nature Study in Australia

History of Education Review , Volume 47 (1): 3 – Jun 4, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/HER-01-2018-0002
Publisher site
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Abstract

inroads of mass schooling programmes but was an ongoing battle about gender and the Book reviews politics of patriarchy concerning who controlled these institutions – men or women? Whitehead’s book resounds with battles won and battles lost. But there is more for the reader to appraise. Whitehead positions her book as a “transnational history”, a relatively new discourse that allows Whitehead and other adherents to “encapsulate the transnational flow of ideas” that are evident in de Lissa’s own story but in the broader politics played out in the book. This approach is particularly useful for portraying the nuances of the imperial networks that are the backdrop to this age and de Lissa’sstory as a “British” colonial. Whitehead also gives presence and visibility to the lives and views of de Lissa’sgraduatesinbothSouth Australia and England. The archival detective work must have been enormous. As a pivotal generation, their lives are a window onto changing gender codes and the burgeoning opportunities (and its challenges) for young women choosing careers in early years education. De Lissa urged her students to be “makers of society”. Again, there is much that resonates to those of us working in early childhood teacher education, albeit now mainly

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 4, 2018

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