Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Education and the quality of life in later years

Education and the quality of life in later years This article explores the benefits to older people of participation in formal study, and considers these in the context of the general debate about the constituents of quality of life. It is based on a study of older students who attended extra‐mural type classes at a London University college. The findings of a postal questionnaire survey are presented as context for a discussion of in‐depth interviews with a selection of participants. Illustrative case studies are presented, highlighting the discourses related to the benefits of study and their meanings in the different lives of the individuals. The second part of the analysis links these findings to issues related to the measuring of quality of life. It is argued that while the emotionally based concerns of individuals often figure most highly in their definition of quality of life, their need to spend time meaningfully is an additional, important dimension. Thus, formal study ‐ through the process itself as well as its outcomes ‐ plays an important role in contributing to the quality of life of older learners, giving them a feeling of ‘time well spent’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Education and the quality of life in later years

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults , Volume 8 (3): 9 – Sep 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/education-and-the-quality-of-life-in-later-years-hqMIHGimVS
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/14717794200700017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article explores the benefits to older people of participation in formal study, and considers these in the context of the general debate about the constituents of quality of life. It is based on a study of older students who attended extra‐mural type classes at a London University college. The findings of a postal questionnaire survey are presented as context for a discussion of in‐depth interviews with a selection of participants. Illustrative case studies are presented, highlighting the discourses related to the benefits of study and their meanings in the different lives of the individuals. The second part of the analysis links these findings to issues related to the measuring of quality of life. It is argued that while the emotionally based concerns of individuals often figure most highly in their definition of quality of life, their need to spend time meaningfully is an additional, important dimension. Thus, formal study ‐ through the process itself as well as its outcomes ‐ plays an important role in contributing to the quality of life of older learners, giving them a feeling of ‘time well spent’.

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2007

Keywords: Continuing education; Formal study; Quality of life; Older people; Older students; Adult education

There are no references for this article.