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Editorial

Editorial Health data governance The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerated the trend towards digitalization that is transforming health care and medicine in many fundamental ways. It is becoming clear that main barriers to building digital health systems are not technological, but institutional and organisational, thus recent national, international and global initiatives and strategic documents on health digitalization emphasise the need for strengthening governance of health data, and discuss approaches to developing data governance frameworks. Specifically, (1) In the report on digital transformation in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, it is stated that such transformation relies on fundamental organisational change, which means overhauling the structures, policies and institutions that govern how systems function. The report concluded that “legal barriers and a lack of trust among patients, the public, data custodians and other stakeholders in the use and protection of data are all major hindrances, as is the lack of agreement on data standards and exchange formats both within and across countries” (OECD, 2019). (2) A recommended practical framework of health data governance in the context of low- and middle-income countries (based on experience from South Africa and India) incorporates four key domains, “covering ethical oversight and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Health Governance Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2059-4631
DOI
10.1108/ijhg-06-2021-137
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Health data governance The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic accelerated the trend towards digitalization that is transforming health care and medicine in many fundamental ways. It is becoming clear that main barriers to building digital health systems are not technological, but institutional and organisational, thus recent national, international and global initiatives and strategic documents on health digitalization emphasise the need for strengthening governance of health data, and discuss approaches to developing data governance frameworks. Specifically, (1) In the report on digital transformation in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, it is stated that such transformation relies on fundamental organisational change, which means overhauling the structures, policies and institutions that govern how systems function. The report concluded that “legal barriers and a lack of trust among patients, the public, data custodians and other stakeholders in the use and protection of data are all major hindrances, as is the lack of agreement on data standards and exchange formats both within and across countries” (OECD, 2019). (2) A recommended practical framework of health data governance in the context of low- and middle-income countries (based on experience from South Africa and India) incorporates four key domains, “covering ethical oversight and

Journal

International Journal of Health GovernanceEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 4, 2021

References