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Editorial

Editorial Organizational plasticity: what is it? How does it work and why does it matter? The entire management enterprise has been built on efforts directed towards efficiency (with varying emphases over the decades; see Scott, 2003). This can be defined as the appropriate disposal of resources such that either the least possible inputs are used to produce an output or more output comes from the exploitation of a given amount of inputs (e.g. Simon, 1997[1947]). This approach has provided tremendous support to the development of management as a discipline and it still contributes to the way management is practiced. As a result of this, we know a great deal about how to structure, plan, create, organize, maintain and improve processes, procedures and routines (Abrahamson, 2002). Instead, we know very little about how to disorganize, create simpler structures from complex structures, isolate and deconstruct/ debunk unnecessary routines, reduce bureaucracy to functional levels, for example, (Abrahamson and Freeman, 2013). And this information would have come at great use to face the constraints to organizational actions imposed by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID- 19) pandemic. Some have categorized all these aspects under the umbrella of disorganization management (Herath et al.,2016, 2017; Herath, 2019a, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Evidence-based HRM a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship Emerald Publishing

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References (15)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2049-3983
DOI
10.1108/ebhrm-06-2021-125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Organizational plasticity: what is it? How does it work and why does it matter? The entire management enterprise has been built on efforts directed towards efficiency (with varying emphases over the decades; see Scott, 2003). This can be defined as the appropriate disposal of resources such that either the least possible inputs are used to produce an output or more output comes from the exploitation of a given amount of inputs (e.g. Simon, 1997[1947]). This approach has provided tremendous support to the development of management as a discipline and it still contributes to the way management is practiced. As a result of this, we know a great deal about how to structure, plan, create, organize, maintain and improve processes, procedures and routines (Abrahamson, 2002). Instead, we know very little about how to disorganize, create simpler structures from complex structures, isolate and deconstruct/ debunk unnecessary routines, reduce bureaucracy to functional levels, for example, (Abrahamson and Freeman, 2013). And this information would have come at great use to face the constraints to organizational actions imposed by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID- 19) pandemic. Some have categorized all these aspects under the umbrella of disorganization management (Herath et al.,2016, 2017; Herath, 2019a,

Journal

Evidence-based HRM a Global Forum for Empirical ScholarshipEmerald Publishing

Published: May 12, 2021

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