Editorial

Editorial Over the last few decades, there have been very unacceptable health inequalities, where babies of impressive improvements in the social, economic families from certain groups are more likely to die and health status in most high income countries. before their first birthday than others. Government Unfortunately, not all within these countries have figures show that in 2004–6 there were 9,741 infant shared this prosperity. It is not a new point of view deaths overall in England and Wales (DH, 2007). This that inequalities in health and social care are equates to an infant mortality rate (IMR) of 5.0 deaths unacceptable and few would argue against the fact per 1,000 live births. Of those with a valid that more needs to be done to tackle this. socioeconomic group, the rate was 4.8 deaths per Developing service systems that meet the needs 1,000. Of the 8,674 deaths in this category, 43% of diverse and marginalised groups has become a (3,751) were in the routine and manual (R&M – central issue in many countries as gaps between the people working in lower supervisory and technical rich and poor become greater and globalisation leads occupations) group, with a rate of 5.6 deaths per http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1757-0980
DOI
10.1108/17570980200800001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Over the last few decades, there have been very unacceptable health inequalities, where babies of impressive improvements in the social, economic families from certain groups are more likely to die and health status in most high income countries. before their first birthday than others. Government Unfortunately, not all within these countries have figures show that in 2004–6 there were 9,741 infant shared this prosperity. It is not a new point of view deaths overall in England and Wales (DH, 2007). This that inequalities in health and social care are equates to an infant mortality rate (IMR) of 5.0 deaths unacceptable and few would argue against the fact per 1,000 live births. Of those with a valid that more needs to be done to tackle this. socioeconomic group, the rate was 4.8 deaths per Developing service systems that meet the needs 1,000. Of the 8,674 deaths in this category, 43% of diverse and marginalised groups has become a (3,751) were in the routine and manual (R&M – central issue in many countries as gaps between the people working in lower supervisory and technical rich and poor become greater and globalisation leads occupations) group, with a rate of 5.6 deaths per

Journal

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social CareEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2008

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