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Editorial

Editorial he aim of this focused practice in suicide prevention tended to look for indicators of issue of the British in the Prison Service. Here the risk of suicide based on a few TJournal of Forensic overlaps between good primary variables. This poses a number Practice is to stimulate and guide and mental health care in the of problems when trying to the development of practice in community and effective suicide understand suicide. It serves to relation to deaths in custody in management in prisons are limit the focus of attempts to general and to self-inflicted evident. The Prison Service also assess risk, often away from deaths in particular. In common faces unique challenges due to important areas. The role of with research into suicide and the nature of custody. These anger and aggression in suicide intentional self-injury in the have complicated the effective in prisons seems to be one such community, this is an area that development of research and neglected area for both future is now beginning to receive the evidence based multi-disciplinary research and intervention. attention that it surely needs and multi-agency working. from policy makers, researchers Despite this the Prison Service’s Leonie Howe looks at deaths and practitioners alike. commitment to developing more in police custody. She suggests effective management of suicide that the health of prisoners is The first paper by Rachel in prisons continues apace, with often a subordinate concern Jenkins and Bruce Singh long term plans for improved for police officers. Surprisingly provides a review of the inter- training, practice and much police officers and forensic national research on policy and greater integration of care with medical examiners are often practice in suicide prevention. It the NHS. poorly trained in assessing risks serves to set the context for such of suicide. Such training is surely deaths in custody. Prisons and Graham Towl goes on to central to improving the care of other custodial settings do not address some of the challenges the many vulnerable members exist in a vacuum. Indeed, in in effectively managing suicide of society who come into police many respects they are simply a in secure settings. The frequent custody. microcosm, reflecting the social, misunderstandings and miscon- economic and health problems ceptions that surround the area Finally, Louisa Snow looks at of the societies they serve. Policy of suicide are discussed, as is an approach developed by the and practice changes in the the use and misuse of terms to New York City Department community therefore have the described suicide, self-injury and of Corrections for preventing potential to have a major impact those at risk of suicide. These suicides. Few would argue that on custodial settings. In turn, act as barriers to more effective prison staff in New York City do custodial settings provide a implementation of evidence not face considerable challenges unique opportunity to intervene based suicide prevention in in caring for prisoners. Yet the effectively with some of those at prisons and other forensic radical changes adopted in New highest risk of suicide and other settings. York appear to have produced forms of self-destructive a remarkable reduction in the behaviour. The next paper looks at the area suicide rates. of risk assessment in suicide, Martin McHugh takes up this focusing on prisons. Previous David Crighton theme in his paper on policy and approaches to this area have Guest Editor The British Journal of Forensic Practice • VOLUME 2 • ISSUE 1 • MARCH, 2000 © Pavilion Publishing Brighton Ltd http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The British Journal of Forensic Practice Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1463-6646
DOI
10.1108/14636646200000001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

he aim of this focused practice in suicide prevention tended to look for indicators of issue of the British in the Prison Service. Here the risk of suicide based on a few TJournal of Forensic overlaps between good primary variables. This poses a number Practice is to stimulate and guide and mental health care in the of problems when trying to the development of practice in community and effective suicide understand suicide. It serves to relation to deaths in custody in management in prisons are limit the focus of attempts to general and to self-inflicted evident. The Prison Service also assess risk, often away from deaths in particular. In common faces unique challenges due to important areas. The role of with research into suicide and the nature of custody. These anger and aggression in suicide intentional self-injury in the have complicated the effective in prisons seems to be one such community, this is an area that development of research and neglected area for both future is now beginning to receive the evidence based multi-disciplinary research and intervention. attention that it surely needs and multi-agency working. from policy makers, researchers Despite this the Prison Service’s Leonie Howe looks at deaths and practitioners alike. commitment to developing more in police custody. She suggests effective management of suicide that the health of prisoners is The first paper by Rachel in prisons continues apace, with often a subordinate concern Jenkins and Bruce Singh long term plans for improved for police officers. Surprisingly provides a review of the inter- training, practice and much police officers and forensic national research on policy and greater integration of care with medical examiners are often practice in suicide prevention. It the NHS. poorly trained in assessing risks serves to set the context for such of suicide. Such training is surely deaths in custody. Prisons and Graham Towl goes on to central to improving the care of other custodial settings do not address some of the challenges the many vulnerable members exist in a vacuum. Indeed, in in effectively managing suicide of society who come into police many respects they are simply a in secure settings. The frequent custody. microcosm, reflecting the social, misunderstandings and miscon- economic and health problems ceptions that surround the area Finally, Louisa Snow looks at of the societies they serve. Policy of suicide are discussed, as is an approach developed by the and practice changes in the the use and misuse of terms to New York City Department community therefore have the described suicide, self-injury and of Corrections for preventing potential to have a major impact those at risk of suicide. These suicides. Few would argue that on custodial settings. In turn, act as barriers to more effective prison staff in New York City do custodial settings provide a implementation of evidence not face considerable challenges unique opportunity to intervene based suicide prevention in in caring for prisoners. Yet the effectively with some of those at prisons and other forensic radical changes adopted in New highest risk of suicide and other settings. York appear to have produced forms of self-destructive a remarkable reduction in the behaviour. The next paper looks at the area suicide rates. of risk assessment in suicide, Martin McHugh takes up this focusing on prisons. Previous David Crighton theme in his paper on policy and approaches to this area have Guest Editor The British Journal of Forensic Practice • VOLUME 2 • ISSUE 1 • MARCH, 2000 © Pavilion Publishing Brighton Ltd

Journal

The British Journal of Forensic PracticeEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.