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Editorial

Editorial Editorial for the special issue on “Managing Industry 4.0 technologies and their impact on the sustainable performance of territories” A proliferation of technological advances often described under the umbrella term of Industry 4.0 (I4.0), are increasingly changing the way firms operate as they improve their productivity and performance (Wagner and Walton, 2016). Despite a substantial body of literature have examined I4.0 at the firm level, its effect on regions and territories is largely remaining unexplored (Rußmann et al., 2015). A wealth of advanced technologies and systems such as artificial intelligence, smart systems, smart cities, predictive analytics, blockchain, autonomous vehicles, Big Data, Internet of Things increasingly change not only the companies that adopt them but also the context within which this adoption take place (Schwab, 2016). The ways new technologies affect the context in which they are being adopted has largely been omitted in the academic literature. Although servicescape is well established in the marketing literature (Nilsson and Ballantyne, 2014), the regional and territorial effects of technological networks are yet under-researched. Past studies have documented the technology productivity paradox (Brynjolfsson, 1993) to describe that productivity and performance in industries and territories did not follow the investments in and expectations from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
1741-0401
DOI
10.1108/ijppm-06-2021-684
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial for the special issue on “Managing Industry 4.0 technologies and their impact on the sustainable performance of territories” A proliferation of technological advances often described under the umbrella term of Industry 4.0 (I4.0), are increasingly changing the way firms operate as they improve their productivity and performance (Wagner and Walton, 2016). Despite a substantial body of literature have examined I4.0 at the firm level, its effect on regions and territories is largely remaining unexplored (Rußmann et al., 2015). A wealth of advanced technologies and systems such as artificial intelligence, smart systems, smart cities, predictive analytics, blockchain, autonomous vehicles, Big Data, Internet of Things increasingly change not only the companies that adopt them but also the context within which this adoption take place (Schwab, 2016). The ways new technologies affect the context in which they are being adopted has largely been omitted in the academic literature. Although servicescape is well established in the marketing literature (Nilsson and Ballantyne, 2014), the regional and territorial effects of technological networks are yet under-researched. Past studies have documented the technology productivity paradox (Brynjolfsson, 1993) to describe that productivity and performance in industries and territories did not follow the investments in and expectations from

Journal

International Journal of Productivity and Performance ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 2, 2021

References