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Editorial

Editorial The collection of papers in this special issue clearly illuminates the substance and spirit of China’s development strategy. What, then, is the spirit of China’s development strategy, which has succeeded in lifting some 850 million people from poverty in 40 odd years [1], increasing the share of China’s GDP in the world economy from about 2% in 1979 to about 20% in 2020 [2], and raising the life expectancy of mainlanders from 66 to close to 77 over the same period [3]? As clearly demonstrated by the articles by Justin Lin on “new structural economics”,Tony Yu and Diana Kwan’sarticleon “entrepreneurial learning”, and Lok Sang Ho’s article on Greater Bay Area, it is a pragmatic, down-to-earth and highly adaptive approach to development. China does not follow any fixed formula, and notwithstanding all the talk about the China Model or the Beijing Consensus, really has no unique “China Model” to teach the world. Yu and Kwan showed how China’s budding entrepreneurs found their niche in the market place through imitating and adapting to the market. Many of these cottage entrepreneurs (called “shanzhai” entrepreneurs) had very little technological knowhow or capital. Yet they first imitated existing models and then added features to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Education and Development Studies Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2046-3162
DOI
10.1108/aeds-07-2020-188
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The collection of papers in this special issue clearly illuminates the substance and spirit of China’s development strategy. What, then, is the spirit of China’s development strategy, which has succeeded in lifting some 850 million people from poverty in 40 odd years [1], increasing the share of China’s GDP in the world economy from about 2% in 1979 to about 20% in 2020 [2], and raising the life expectancy of mainlanders from 66 to close to 77 over the same period [3]? As clearly demonstrated by the articles by Justin Lin on “new structural economics”,Tony Yu and Diana Kwan’sarticleon “entrepreneurial learning”, and Lok Sang Ho’s article on Greater Bay Area, it is a pragmatic, down-to-earth and highly adaptive approach to development. China does not follow any fixed formula, and notwithstanding all the talk about the China Model or the Beijing Consensus, really has no unique “China Model” to teach the world. Yu and Kwan showed how China’s budding entrepreneurs found their niche in the market place through imitating and adapting to the market. Many of these cottage entrepreneurs (called “shanzhai” entrepreneurs) had very little technological knowhow or capital. Yet they first imitated existing models and then added features to

Journal

Asian Education and Development StudiesEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 9, 2020

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