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Editorial

Editorial Ron Iphofen Editor We are privileged to open this issue of Quality implementation of policy. Jill Manthorpe and in Ageing with observations by Sir Christopher Helen Alaszewski’s localised study of Ball that build on both the Carnegie Report and practitioners working with dementia continues to the Tokyo Forum. He is well-known for his cast doubt on the extent to which services are many contributions to the Third Age debate and able to work together. Although this is a small- here he provokes thinking on the nature of ‘the scale study, they advocate the value of such good life’ in older age. In an attempt to add research in highlighting the detail in the some precision to how that might be difficulty of inter-agency working and in the accomplished, in part, we offer some views on maintenance of adequate service provision. exercise for older people from Julie Sobczak. Practitioners clearly see a need for more Her book on exercise was published by Age specialist services for people with dementia and Concern (England) and provides a wealth of their carers, and they express the hope that the ideas on how to help older people maintain or advent of primary care trusts may offer an increase their fitness and independence through organisational opportunity for clarification of movement and exercise. roles and for increased understanding and co- Even though we were able to ‘theme’ our last operation. issue around the ESRC Growing Older project, In similar vein, Charles Patmore’s report of a we do expect a continuing trickle of articles study of frail older people and their community from associates as the findings from the range of care needs illustrates how vital it is to gain projects emerge. To continue our links we users’ perspectives - as well as demonstrating, in publish some results of the work of Tom Scharf a very direct manner, how research and practice and colleagues on the ways in which can be linked in the interests of the respondents neighbourhoods contribute to the shaping of themselves. The interviewers were all service their older residents’ identities. The issues they managers able to respond directly to identified point up are connected to concepts of place and needs. The complexity of links between morale space - the forms of attachment and how and quality of life for frail older people is perceptions change with growing older. Their highlighted by the opportunity to compare study is of city areas of intense social experiences in different geographical areas. deprivation, but a host of comparative lessons To close this issue we offer a discussion of for the impact of neighbourhood more generally elder abuse issues from Yvonne Craig, based on can usefully be drawn. Most important, this her work in the Elder Mediation Project. She work questions the assumption that all areas of suggests that multi-disciplinary service-provider social exclusion are similar in all respects. co-operation and cross-service user involvement Scharf and colleagues advocate ensuring a focus offer a demonstration model for elder abuse on neighbourhood in the policy agenda so that casework – an approach which empowers all the many differences, as well as the similarities, participants in confronting constructively their between localities can be addressed. interpersonal conflicts with increasing We continue to regard participants’ understanding, and in resisting divisive or perceptions as vital in the evaluation of the destructive social pressures. 2 Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 3 Issue 2 June 2002 © Pavilion Publishing 2002 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality in Ageing and Older Adults Emerald Publishing

Editorial

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults , Volume 3 (2): 1 – Jun 1, 2002

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1471-7794
DOI
10.1108/14717794200200008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ron Iphofen Editor We are privileged to open this issue of Quality implementation of policy. Jill Manthorpe and in Ageing with observations by Sir Christopher Helen Alaszewski’s localised study of Ball that build on both the Carnegie Report and practitioners working with dementia continues to the Tokyo Forum. He is well-known for his cast doubt on the extent to which services are many contributions to the Third Age debate and able to work together. Although this is a small- here he provokes thinking on the nature of ‘the scale study, they advocate the value of such good life’ in older age. In an attempt to add research in highlighting the detail in the some precision to how that might be difficulty of inter-agency working and in the accomplished, in part, we offer some views on maintenance of adequate service provision. exercise for older people from Julie Sobczak. Practitioners clearly see a need for more Her book on exercise was published by Age specialist services for people with dementia and Concern (England) and provides a wealth of their carers, and they express the hope that the ideas on how to help older people maintain or advent of primary care trusts may offer an increase their fitness and independence through organisational opportunity for clarification of movement and exercise. roles and for increased understanding and co- Even though we were able to ‘theme’ our last operation. issue around the ESRC Growing Older project, In similar vein, Charles Patmore’s report of a we do expect a continuing trickle of articles study of frail older people and their community from associates as the findings from the range of care needs illustrates how vital it is to gain projects emerge. To continue our links we users’ perspectives - as well as demonstrating, in publish some results of the work of Tom Scharf a very direct manner, how research and practice and colleagues on the ways in which can be linked in the interests of the respondents neighbourhoods contribute to the shaping of themselves. The interviewers were all service their older residents’ identities. The issues they managers able to respond directly to identified point up are connected to concepts of place and needs. The complexity of links between morale space - the forms of attachment and how and quality of life for frail older people is perceptions change with growing older. Their highlighted by the opportunity to compare study is of city areas of intense social experiences in different geographical areas. deprivation, but a host of comparative lessons To close this issue we offer a discussion of for the impact of neighbourhood more generally elder abuse issues from Yvonne Craig, based on can usefully be drawn. Most important, this her work in the Elder Mediation Project. She work questions the assumption that all areas of suggests that multi-disciplinary service-provider social exclusion are similar in all respects. co-operation and cross-service user involvement Scharf and colleagues advocate ensuring a focus offer a demonstration model for elder abuse on neighbourhood in the policy agenda so that casework – an approach which empowers all the many differences, as well as the similarities, participants in confronting constructively their between localities can be addressed. interpersonal conflicts with increasing We continue to regard participants’ understanding, and in resisting divisive or perceptions as vital in the evaluation of the destructive social pressures. 2 Quality in Ageing – Policy, practice and research Volume 3 Issue 2 June 2002 © Pavilion Publishing 2002

Journal

Quality in Ageing and Older AdultsEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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