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Editorial

Editorial Elizabeth Parker Editor his issue of the Mental Health Review Bouras describes the setting up and operation of the focuses on services for learning disabled people who Estia Centre which aims to bring together clinical also suffer from mental illness. Learning disability, the services, training and research for people with mental most common form of disability in Britain affecting health needs and/or learning disabilities or challenging around 1.2 million people, is a life-long condition behaviour. The acknowledgement of the split between which is often associated with other impairments practice and research, the growing demand for including mental disorder. Those who are both learning evidence-based interventions, and the need to ensure disabled and mentally ill are twice disadvantaged and that staff have the necessary skill and expertise were are likely to suffer an even greater degree of social the factors leading to the Centre being established. exclusion. The challenge facing services is how best to In complete contrast, the Judith Trust originated meet the health and social care needs of this doubly from one family’s experience of a learning disabled disabled group. sister who is also mentally ill. Annette Lawson gives a Bill Robbins, in a Personal Perspective, draws on graphic and moving account of her sister’s experiences his own experience to reach conclusions about services and changing needs at different periods of her life for learning disabled people with mental illness which which led to the establishment of the Trust. The aim support the ‘normalisation’ policy and which are of the Judith Trust is to ‘plug the gaps in services that examined further by the other contributors. He also seem too often unable to reconcile the fact that a tackles the use of the term ‘dual diagnosis’ and person who has limited intellectual ability will also observes that in the learning disability services it have emotional needs and frequently serious mental refers to people with a learning disability and a mental illness’ and Dr Lawson describes its work to date. illness but elsewhere it tends to refer to mental illness As far as possible services for people with mental combined with substance misuse – a source of confu- health and/or learning disability needs are to be sion when it is used in the unfamiliar context. community based and Sheila Hollins portrays in some The Framework Feature, written by Mary detail the problems in operating such a service. Her Lindsey, chair of the faculty for the Psychiatry of conclusions echo those of Dr Lindsey and Professor Learning Disability at the Royal College of Bouras: more research and the application of research Psychiatrists, gives an authoritative and comprehensive findings to clinical practice. overview of the issues involved in providing services Finally, turning to the context in which services for this type of patient. are delivered, Alison Giraud-Saunders and Rob Greig Government policy is that people with learning examine different types of trust configuration and the disabilities should have the same right to NHS extent to which they facilitate the provision of services services as the rest of the population. However, for learning disabled and mentally ill people. After following the closure of the institutions where many setting out the pros and cons of each type of model learning disabled people with mental illness were they conclude that there is no ‘best buy’. previously cared for, it is not clear how this ‘equal right For those of you involved in commissioning and of access’ is to be achieved and Dr Lindsey concludes providing services for learning disabled people with that further work is needed to identify proven and mental illness, this issue of the Review brings you the effective forms of service, whether generic mental ‘state of the art’ information and thinking from the health services, or specialist services, or some leading figures in the field and will, I hope, both combination of the two. clarify the issues involved and promote the provision, The case studies depict two very different in partnership, of effective services drawn from both initiatives to provide the services required. Nick learning disability and mental health services. 2 The Mental Health Review Volume 5 Issue 2 June 2000 © Pavilion Publishing (Brighton) 2000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mental Health Review Journal Emerald Publishing

Editorial

Mental Health Review Journal , Volume 5 (2): 1 – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1361-9322
DOI
10.1108/13619322200000011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Elizabeth Parker Editor his issue of the Mental Health Review Bouras describes the setting up and operation of the focuses on services for learning disabled people who Estia Centre which aims to bring together clinical also suffer from mental illness. Learning disability, the services, training and research for people with mental most common form of disability in Britain affecting health needs and/or learning disabilities or challenging around 1.2 million people, is a life-long condition behaviour. The acknowledgement of the split between which is often associated with other impairments practice and research, the growing demand for including mental disorder. Those who are both learning evidence-based interventions, and the need to ensure disabled and mentally ill are twice disadvantaged and that staff have the necessary skill and expertise were are likely to suffer an even greater degree of social the factors leading to the Centre being established. exclusion. The challenge facing services is how best to In complete contrast, the Judith Trust originated meet the health and social care needs of this doubly from one family’s experience of a learning disabled disabled group. sister who is also mentally ill. Annette Lawson gives a Bill Robbins, in a Personal Perspective, draws on graphic and moving account of her sister’s experiences his own experience to reach conclusions about services and changing needs at different periods of her life for learning disabled people with mental illness which which led to the establishment of the Trust. The aim support the ‘normalisation’ policy and which are of the Judith Trust is to ‘plug the gaps in services that examined further by the other contributors. He also seem too often unable to reconcile the fact that a tackles the use of the term ‘dual diagnosis’ and person who has limited intellectual ability will also observes that in the learning disability services it have emotional needs and frequently serious mental refers to people with a learning disability and a mental illness’ and Dr Lawson describes its work to date. illness but elsewhere it tends to refer to mental illness As far as possible services for people with mental combined with substance misuse – a source of confu- health and/or learning disability needs are to be sion when it is used in the unfamiliar context. community based and Sheila Hollins portrays in some The Framework Feature, written by Mary detail the problems in operating such a service. Her Lindsey, chair of the faculty for the Psychiatry of conclusions echo those of Dr Lindsey and Professor Learning Disability at the Royal College of Bouras: more research and the application of research Psychiatrists, gives an authoritative and comprehensive findings to clinical practice. overview of the issues involved in providing services Finally, turning to the context in which services for this type of patient. are delivered, Alison Giraud-Saunders and Rob Greig Government policy is that people with learning examine different types of trust configuration and the disabilities should have the same right to NHS extent to which they facilitate the provision of services services as the rest of the population. However, for learning disabled and mentally ill people. After following the closure of the institutions where many setting out the pros and cons of each type of model learning disabled people with mental illness were they conclude that there is no ‘best buy’. previously cared for, it is not clear how this ‘equal right For those of you involved in commissioning and of access’ is to be achieved and Dr Lindsey concludes providing services for learning disabled people with that further work is needed to identify proven and mental illness, this issue of the Review brings you the effective forms of service, whether generic mental ‘state of the art’ information and thinking from the health services, or specialist services, or some leading figures in the field and will, I hope, both combination of the two. clarify the issues involved and promote the provision, The case studies depict two very different in partnership, of effective services drawn from both initiatives to provide the services required. Nick learning disability and mental health services. 2 The Mental Health Review Volume 5 Issue 2 June 2000 © Pavilion Publishing (Brighton) 2000

Journal

Mental Health Review JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2000

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