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Ecologies of practice in tertiary art and design: a review of two cases

Ecologies of practice in tertiary art and design: a review of two cases Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to re-orientate assessment tasks in tertiary art and design, arguing the important role ecologies of practice and work-place learning play in professional identity formation. Linking coursework design with dilemmas and self-regulatory tasks which move beyond compliance and static content in isolated courses. Design/methodology/approach– Two purposive case studies were selected from one academic year across two programs. Student feedback data demonstrated how the first blog journal case provided a metacognitive structure for postgraduates’ while working in the arts industry. The second eportfolio case illustrates ecologies supporting undergraduate “practice architectures” during pre-service practicum. Findings– Ecologies of practice reveal complexity and inform professional judgment by allowing unsettling issues and concerns to be addressed. Changing commitment through future orientation counteracts institutional requirements for self-portrayal by fostering greater participation by learners. Research limitations/implications– Survey data limitations are addressed through peer-review, emergent trends and longevity of the learning design. Guidelines on how to provide critical and constructive feedback within collaborative cohorts, prioritizes intrinsic motivation, indeterminacy and authentic principles in career related pathways. Practical implications– Assessment, course and program re-design engaged with ecologies of practice produced student qualitative commentary giving “voice” and evidence of teleo (purpose) and affective (commitment) in ways not typically known in academic programs. Social implications– Students self-regulate learning and utilize technology within a “safe” learning space. Social connectedness through articulated encounters powerfully impacts personal awareness, confidence and resilience. Originality/value– This research has provided critical guidelines for how to scaffold feedback in professional learning. The case studies show how reflective environments engaged with unresolved critical incidents build professional knowledge and identity across time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning Emerald Publishing

Ecologies of practice in tertiary art and design: a review of two cases

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2042-3896
DOI
10.1108/HESWBL-04-2015-0014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to re-orientate assessment tasks in tertiary art and design, arguing the important role ecologies of practice and work-place learning play in professional identity formation. Linking coursework design with dilemmas and self-regulatory tasks which move beyond compliance and static content in isolated courses. Design/methodology/approach– Two purposive case studies were selected from one academic year across two programs. Student feedback data demonstrated how the first blog journal case provided a metacognitive structure for postgraduates’ while working in the arts industry. The second eportfolio case illustrates ecologies supporting undergraduate “practice architectures” during pre-service practicum. Findings– Ecologies of practice reveal complexity and inform professional judgment by allowing unsettling issues and concerns to be addressed. Changing commitment through future orientation counteracts institutional requirements for self-portrayal by fostering greater participation by learners. Research limitations/implications– Survey data limitations are addressed through peer-review, emergent trends and longevity of the learning design. Guidelines on how to provide critical and constructive feedback within collaborative cohorts, prioritizes intrinsic motivation, indeterminacy and authentic principles in career related pathways. Practical implications– Assessment, course and program re-design engaged with ecologies of practice produced student qualitative commentary giving “voice” and evidence of teleo (purpose) and affective (commitment) in ways not typically known in academic programs. Social implications– Students self-regulate learning and utilize technology within a “safe” learning space. Social connectedness through articulated encounters powerfully impacts personal awareness, confidence and resilience. Originality/value– This research has provided critical guidelines for how to scaffold feedback in professional learning. The case studies show how reflective environments engaged with unresolved critical incidents build professional knowledge and identity across time.

Journal

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based LearningEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 8, 2016

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