Eartoground

Eartoground -TO- GROUND EAR *B.O.A.C. AND THE VC10. The Super VC10 is proving as popular with the travelling public as the Standard VC10 according to B.O.A.C. In the first year of operations, B.O.A.C. Standard VC10s carried more than 216,000 passengers, while in the first month of operations B.O.A.C. Super VClOs carried over 10,700 passengers. Revenue load factor on the London/ New York service up to April 10, stood at 84·8 per cent and at 74·6 per cent on return flights. *HS.748-PAYLOADUP,RANGEUPANDSALES UP. Since our detailed technical description of the Hawker Siddeley 748 was published in the March 1965 issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, the manufacturers have announced an increase in all-up weight by 1,000 lb. to 44,500 lb. while, at the same time, zero fuel weight has been increased by 500 lb. to 37,500 lb . These increases provide airline operators with a payload increases of 740 lb. and a range increase of 160 miles. The result is that 58 passengers may now be carried As discussions proceed between France and Britain concern­ along with their baggage over 800 nautical mile ing the design and developmen t of a high-capacity 'airbus'. sectors or 40 passengers can be carried up to 1,400 Short's remind airlines of th e capabilities of their Belfast SC.5/I0A . This aircraf t is a two-dec k version of th e standard nautical miles with full reserves. Fuel capacity has also freighte r capable of accommodatin g seven-abreast seating been increased to 1,440 Imp. galls. Orders for the on both levels—a tota l of 284 passengers al l told . Th e charac­ HS.748 in its various civil and military variants now teristics of this Belfast variant were fully discussed in the Octobe r 1944 issue of AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING, p, 3IS. top 100—see 'Orders and Contracts', p. 192. *A-B.U.A. AN D THE VC10. As a result of the ex­ *BULLEID MEMORIAL LECTURES. These Ice- cellent results obtained with its first VC10 airliners in tures are presented bienniallyin the UniversityojNotting­ their first six months of operation, British United ham—endowed by the Professor C. H. Bulleid Memorial Airways is ordering a third aircraft for delivery in Fund and are intended to be of interest to a wide range of July this year. The two original aircraft have achieved engineers. This year's lectures will be delivered on July 1 remarkable utilization figures—8·4 flying hours per and 7 by Mr H. LI. D. Pugh, B.Sc. (Wales), B.Sc. (Lon­ day and 9 hours per day. According to Mr F . A. don), F.Inst.P., F.I.M., M.I.Mech.E., who is Head of *MARTIN-BAKER EJECTION SEATS—ONE Laker. B.U.A.'s Managing Director'.. . no other new the Plasticity Division at the National Engineering THOUSAND LIVES SAVED. Last month we pub- aircraft has achieved this level of utilization in its first Laboratory. lished a major article describing the development of year of operation'. When B.U.A. took delivery of the The topic will be 'Recent Developments in Cold Form­ Martin-Baker ejection seats on the occasion of 1,000 first VC10, the overhaul life of the Rolls-Royce ing' as follows: lives being saved. Based on the successful ejection rate Conway 42 stood at 800 hours but engines are cur­ for the previous twelve months, we had estimated in Lecture No. 1 The Cold Extrusion of Steel rently under trial to 1,800 hours and before the end of January 1965 that the thousandth life would be saved in Lecture No. 1 High-speed Forming of Metals 1965, some are expected to be on trial to at least 2,500 May and, in fact, we went to press with the May issue hours. Lecture No. 3 Hydrostatic Extrusion on exactly the same day that Martin-Baker announced that the figure had been achieved. There is little more Lecture No. 4 Mechanical Properties under Pressure to add to our leading article and comments published *ROYAL AERONAUTICAL SOCIETY CENTEN­ and their Significance in the Forming of Metals last month except to congratulate all concerned—and ARY YEAR—1966. His Royal Highness, the Duke of Bound advance copies of the Lecture Notes will be especially Mr James Martin, C.B.E., M.I.Mech.E., Edinburgh, K.G., has honoured the Royal Aeronautical available at £3 2s 0d per copy and accommodation for F.R.Ae.S., Managing Director and Chief Designer of Society by consenting to be the Honorary President of period can be provided. Admission to the lectures is free, the Martin-Baker Aircraft Co. Ltd. (pictured above). the Society for its Centenary Year, 1966. Founded in and application forms together with lecture synopsis London on January 12, 1866, the Society's Centenary The company's ejection seats are the inspiration of and other details may be obtained from The Secretary, Celebrations will extend throughout the year, beginning Mr Martin and he has controlled and directed seat Faculty of Applied Science, The University, Nottingham. with a Conversazione at the Science Museum on development during the last 21 years. He is universally Wednesday, January 12, 1966. acknowledged to be a leading authority and pioneer of aircrew assisted escape systems and was awarded the *MARLEY AND THE VC10. Space Saver Doors of Wakefield Gold Medal of the Royal Aeronautical *PRECISION RUBBERS AND THE VCI0. De­ the 'concertina' folding type are fitted to VC10 and Society in 1951, The Laura Taber Barbour Air Safety spite the comprehensive nature of our technical ap­ Super VC10 aircraft. These doors, produced by the Award in 1958 (becoming the first non-American to re­ praisal of the Super VC10 published in the April 1965 Marley Tile Co. Ltd., Riverhcad, Sevenoaks, Kent, are ceive this award), the Cumberbach Air Safety Award in issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, it was perhaps in­ fitted to the movable non-structural bulkheads which 1959, and the Royal Aero Club Gold Medal in 1965 evitable that some of those British companies con­ can be positioned at any position along the fuselage for his work on ejection seats. He was also appointed cerned with the aircraft would not be given due credit. length to act as a divider between First and Economy Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1950 and One such company was Precision Rubbers Ltd., class seating or between passengers and freight. Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1957. Bagworth, Leicester, who we are now pleased to con­ Advantages of these doors over curtains include their Martin-Baker seats are now saving an average of firm are the main suppliers of rubber accessories in­ rigidity during flight manoeuvres and the neat manner three lives a week or about 160 lives each year. The cluding door seals, window seals, flight deck seals, in which they fold away. Being vinyl covered, the thousandth live saved was that of a pilot of the U.S. freight bay seals, landing gear seals and a host of other Space Saver Doors are also more durable and can be A.F. who ejected on May 6 from an F-4C Phantom. items. cleaned with a damp cloth while in situ. June 1965 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb034029
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Abstract

-TO- GROUND EAR *B.O.A.C. AND THE VC10. The Super VC10 is proving as popular with the travelling public as the Standard VC10 according to B.O.A.C. In the first year of operations, B.O.A.C. Standard VC10s carried more than 216,000 passengers, while in the first month of operations B.O.A.C. Super VClOs carried over 10,700 passengers. Revenue load factor on the London/ New York service up to April 10, stood at 84·8 per cent and at 74·6 per cent on return flights. *HS.748-PAYLOADUP,RANGEUPANDSALES UP. Since our detailed technical description of the Hawker Siddeley 748 was published in the March 1965 issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, the manufacturers have announced an increase in all-up weight by 1,000 lb. to 44,500 lb. while, at the same time, zero fuel weight has been increased by 500 lb. to 37,500 lb . These increases provide airline operators with a payload increases of 740 lb. and a range increase of 160 miles. The result is that 58 passengers may now be carried As discussions proceed between France and Britain concern­ along with their baggage over 800 nautical mile ing the design and developmen t of a high-capacity 'airbus'. sectors or 40 passengers can be carried up to 1,400 Short's remind airlines of th e capabilities of their Belfast SC.5/I0A . This aircraf t is a two-dec k version of th e standard nautical miles with full reserves. Fuel capacity has also freighte r capable of accommodatin g seven-abreast seating been increased to 1,440 Imp. galls. Orders for the on both levels—a tota l of 284 passengers al l told . Th e charac­ HS.748 in its various civil and military variants now teristics of this Belfast variant were fully discussed in the Octobe r 1944 issue of AIRCRAF T ENGINEERING, p, 3IS. top 100—see 'Orders and Contracts', p. 192. *A-B.U.A. AN D THE VC10. As a result of the ex­ *BULLEID MEMORIAL LECTURES. These Ice- cellent results obtained with its first VC10 airliners in tures are presented bienniallyin the UniversityojNotting­ their first six months of operation, British United ham—endowed by the Professor C. H. Bulleid Memorial Airways is ordering a third aircraft for delivery in Fund and are intended to be of interest to a wide range of July this year. The two original aircraft have achieved engineers. This year's lectures will be delivered on July 1 remarkable utilization figures—8·4 flying hours per and 7 by Mr H. LI. D. Pugh, B.Sc. (Wales), B.Sc. (Lon­ day and 9 hours per day. According to Mr F . A. don), F.Inst.P., F.I.M., M.I.Mech.E., who is Head of *MARTIN-BAKER EJECTION SEATS—ONE Laker. B.U.A.'s Managing Director'.. . no other new the Plasticity Division at the National Engineering THOUSAND LIVES SAVED. Last month we pub- aircraft has achieved this level of utilization in its first Laboratory. lished a major article describing the development of year of operation'. When B.U.A. took delivery of the The topic will be 'Recent Developments in Cold Form­ Martin-Baker ejection seats on the occasion of 1,000 first VC10, the overhaul life of the Rolls-Royce ing' as follows: lives being saved. Based on the successful ejection rate Conway 42 stood at 800 hours but engines are cur­ for the previous twelve months, we had estimated in Lecture No. 1 The Cold Extrusion of Steel rently under trial to 1,800 hours and before the end of January 1965 that the thousandth life would be saved in Lecture No. 1 High-speed Forming of Metals 1965, some are expected to be on trial to at least 2,500 May and, in fact, we went to press with the May issue hours. Lecture No. 3 Hydrostatic Extrusion on exactly the same day that Martin-Baker announced that the figure had been achieved. There is little more Lecture No. 4 Mechanical Properties under Pressure to add to our leading article and comments published *ROYAL AERONAUTICAL SOCIETY CENTEN­ and their Significance in the Forming of Metals last month except to congratulate all concerned—and ARY YEAR—1966. His Royal Highness, the Duke of Bound advance copies of the Lecture Notes will be especially Mr James Martin, C.B.E., M.I.Mech.E., Edinburgh, K.G., has honoured the Royal Aeronautical available at £3 2s 0d per copy and accommodation for F.R.Ae.S., Managing Director and Chief Designer of Society by consenting to be the Honorary President of period can be provided. Admission to the lectures is free, the Martin-Baker Aircraft Co. Ltd. (pictured above). the Society for its Centenary Year, 1966. Founded in and application forms together with lecture synopsis London on January 12, 1866, the Society's Centenary The company's ejection seats are the inspiration of and other details may be obtained from The Secretary, Celebrations will extend throughout the year, beginning Mr Martin and he has controlled and directed seat Faculty of Applied Science, The University, Nottingham. with a Conversazione at the Science Museum on development during the last 21 years. He is universally Wednesday, January 12, 1966. acknowledged to be a leading authority and pioneer of aircrew assisted escape systems and was awarded the *MARLEY AND THE VC10. Space Saver Doors of Wakefield Gold Medal of the Royal Aeronautical *PRECISION RUBBERS AND THE VCI0. De­ the 'concertina' folding type are fitted to VC10 and Society in 1951, The Laura Taber Barbour Air Safety spite the comprehensive nature of our technical ap­ Super VC10 aircraft. These doors, produced by the Award in 1958 (becoming the first non-American to re­ praisal of the Super VC10 published in the April 1965 Marley Tile Co. Ltd., Riverhcad, Sevenoaks, Kent, are ceive this award), the Cumberbach Air Safety Award in issue of AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING, it was perhaps in­ fitted to the movable non-structural bulkheads which 1959, and the Royal Aero Club Gold Medal in 1965 evitable that some of those British companies con­ can be positioned at any position along the fuselage for his work on ejection seats. He was also appointed cerned with the aircraft would not be given due credit. length to act as a divider between First and Economy Officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1950 and One such company was Precision Rubbers Ltd., class seating or between passengers and freight. Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1957. Bagworth, Leicester, who we are now pleased to con­ Advantages of these doors over curtains include their Martin-Baker seats are now saving an average of firm are the main suppliers of rubber accessories in­ rigidity during flight manoeuvres and the neat manner three lives a week or about 160 lives each year. The cluding door seals, window seals, flight deck seals, in which they fold away. Being vinyl covered, the thousandth live saved was that of a pilot of the U.S. freight bay seals, landing gear seals and a host of other Space Saver Doors are also more durable and can be A.F. who ejected on May 6 from an F-4C Phantom. items. cleaned with a damp cloth while in situ. June 1965

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1965

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