Eartoground

Eartoground 32 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING January 1971 *B.A.C. BUILD INTELSAT IV. The Space Systems Group of British Aircraft Corporation have assembled and spin-tested at their spacecraft assembly facility at Filton the fourth Intelsat IV satellite to be built. B.A.C. is the main overseas contractor to the Hughes Aircraft Co., the designers of the spacecraft, in association with the ten overseas sub-contractors some of whom have participated in the design stages and are engaged in the manufacture of sub-systems. The Intelsat IV is the world's largest commercial communications satellite with the capacity to relay up to 6,000 two-way telephone calls or 12 colour television programmes. It has a diameter of nearly eight feet and is 17½ feet high. Weight at lift-off with the satellite to booster adaptor and the apogee motor propellant is 3,058 lb. and in orbit the mass will be 1,544 lb. The Intelsat IV programme is directed by the Communications Satellite Corporation (COMSAT) acting as manager for the International Telecommu­ nications Satellite Consortium (INTELSAT) com­ prising 76 member nations. Each satellite will have 12 broadband communication channels each having a bandwidth of about 40 MHz providing capacity for about 500 communication circuits. It is expected to have an operational life of seven years, during which its two 'spotlight' antennae can be beamed at heavily populated areas such as Western Europe and the Eastern United States. In addition two earth coverage antennae can serve areas not served by the spot beams. Ground controllers can select the desired spot or global coverage when the satellite is in orbit. Some thirty members of B.A.C. staff who were specialists in structures, power sub-systems, satellite orientation systems, wiring harnesses and ground test equipment were seconded to Hughes Aircraft Co. in America in the design stages of the first Intelsat IV spacecraft. One of the first tasks for B.A.C. was the design and manufacture of ground handling equip­ ment needed from the beginning of the programme. Numerous sub-systems have been manufactured and shipped to Hughes including spun structures, wiring harnesses, solar panels, antennae masts, rocket motor adaptors, positioning and orientation sub-systems, and nutation dampers. The Filton spacecraft assembly facility, entirely B.A.C. financed, has enabled the company to be the first in the Western world, outside of the U.S., to build and test a communications satellite. The first Intelsat IV was scheduled to be launched on January 13 from Cape Kennedy by an Atlas Centaur *GLIDER DESIGN COMPETITION. The Gliding limitation of 13 metres. The winning design will be rocket. The satellite is first put into a parking orbit Federation of Australia and the Australian Gliding built as a prototype by Riley Aeronautics Ltd., Tocum- and then a second burn of the Centaur stage enables magazine have announced a design competition for a wal, N.S.W., and after initial test flying will become it to reach synchronous altitude in a transfer orbit. At 13 metre sailplane. The intention is to elicit the design the property of the designer. Open Class gliders now apogee of the orbit the spacecraft's on-board rocket of a good small sailplane of simple construction which have spans of up to 22 metres and their price has been escalating even faster than the span with the result motor injects it into a circular equatorial orbit 22,300 can be built by amateur or club groups but with a that they are beyond the means of the majority of miles above the earth and with an orbital velocity that cross-country performance good enough to allow it to glider pilots and clubs. The present 15 metre Standard matches the earth's rotational speed. participate in class competitions with a wingspan Class gliders are becoming more sophisticated and expensive, and the 13 metre glider could form the basis of a new international competition class. Entries for this competition (which closes on Decem­ ber 1, 1971) are invited from all interested parties. The rules and conditions of entry are available from Mr M. Simons, 24 Launer Avenue, Rostrevor, South Australia 5073. *NEW FIAT G91 DERIVATIVE. The Fiat G91 YS, a version of the G91 Y, and developed by Fiat to meet the Swiss government specification for a new combat aircraft, is undergoing flight trials at Caselle airport, Turin. Unlike the C91 Y flown by the Italian Air Force, the Fiat G91 YS version features special avionics and a third set of under wing pylons outboard of the original pylons. The additional pylons fitted to the 'S' version are mainly designed for the transport of the Sidewinder air-to-air missiles which considerably enhance the aircraft's defence capability. In addition to the Sidewinders for which the third set of pylons has been provided, the Fiat 91 YS can carry on the other two sets of pylons various types of loads up to a weight of 4,000 lb. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/eartoground-45yhcWzyHu
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb034719
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

32 AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING January 1971 *B.A.C. BUILD INTELSAT IV. The Space Systems Group of British Aircraft Corporation have assembled and spin-tested at their spacecraft assembly facility at Filton the fourth Intelsat IV satellite to be built. B.A.C. is the main overseas contractor to the Hughes Aircraft Co., the designers of the spacecraft, in association with the ten overseas sub-contractors some of whom have participated in the design stages and are engaged in the manufacture of sub-systems. The Intelsat IV is the world's largest commercial communications satellite with the capacity to relay up to 6,000 two-way telephone calls or 12 colour television programmes. It has a diameter of nearly eight feet and is 17½ feet high. Weight at lift-off with the satellite to booster adaptor and the apogee motor propellant is 3,058 lb. and in orbit the mass will be 1,544 lb. The Intelsat IV programme is directed by the Communications Satellite Corporation (COMSAT) acting as manager for the International Telecommu­ nications Satellite Consortium (INTELSAT) com­ prising 76 member nations. Each satellite will have 12 broadband communication channels each having a bandwidth of about 40 MHz providing capacity for about 500 communication circuits. It is expected to have an operational life of seven years, during which its two 'spotlight' antennae can be beamed at heavily populated areas such as Western Europe and the Eastern United States. In addition two earth coverage antennae can serve areas not served by the spot beams. Ground controllers can select the desired spot or global coverage when the satellite is in orbit. Some thirty members of B.A.C. staff who were specialists in structures, power sub-systems, satellite orientation systems, wiring harnesses and ground test equipment were seconded to Hughes Aircraft Co. in America in the design stages of the first Intelsat IV spacecraft. One of the first tasks for B.A.C. was the design and manufacture of ground handling equip­ ment needed from the beginning of the programme. Numerous sub-systems have been manufactured and shipped to Hughes including spun structures, wiring harnesses, solar panels, antennae masts, rocket motor adaptors, positioning and orientation sub-systems, and nutation dampers. The Filton spacecraft assembly facility, entirely B.A.C. financed, has enabled the company to be the first in the Western world, outside of the U.S., to build and test a communications satellite. The first Intelsat IV was scheduled to be launched on January 13 from Cape Kennedy by an Atlas Centaur *GLIDER DESIGN COMPETITION. The Gliding limitation of 13 metres. The winning design will be rocket. The satellite is first put into a parking orbit Federation of Australia and the Australian Gliding built as a prototype by Riley Aeronautics Ltd., Tocum- and then a second burn of the Centaur stage enables magazine have announced a design competition for a wal, N.S.W., and after initial test flying will become it to reach synchronous altitude in a transfer orbit. At 13 metre sailplane. The intention is to elicit the design the property of the designer. Open Class gliders now apogee of the orbit the spacecraft's on-board rocket of a good small sailplane of simple construction which have spans of up to 22 metres and their price has been escalating even faster than the span with the result motor injects it into a circular equatorial orbit 22,300 can be built by amateur or club groups but with a that they are beyond the means of the majority of miles above the earth and with an orbital velocity that cross-country performance good enough to allow it to glider pilots and clubs. The present 15 metre Standard matches the earth's rotational speed. participate in class competitions with a wingspan Class gliders are becoming more sophisticated and expensive, and the 13 metre glider could form the basis of a new international competition class. Entries for this competition (which closes on Decem­ ber 1, 1971) are invited from all interested parties. The rules and conditions of entry are available from Mr M. Simons, 24 Launer Avenue, Rostrevor, South Australia 5073. *NEW FIAT G91 DERIVATIVE. The Fiat G91 YS, a version of the G91 Y, and developed by Fiat to meet the Swiss government specification for a new combat aircraft, is undergoing flight trials at Caselle airport, Turin. Unlike the C91 Y flown by the Italian Air Force, the Fiat G91 YS version features special avionics and a third set of under wing pylons outboard of the original pylons. The additional pylons fitted to the 'S' version are mainly designed for the transport of the Sidewinder air-to-air missiles which considerably enhance the aircraft's defence capability. In addition to the Sidewinders for which the third set of pylons has been provided, the Fiat 91 YS can carry on the other two sets of pylons various types of loads up to a weight of 4,000 lb.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1971

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off