E‐government adoption: architecture and barriers

E‐government adoption: architecture and barriers Purpose – To provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government that represents the alignment of IT infrastructure with business process management in public sector organisations and classify the barriers that might complicate the implementation of the proposed architecture framework. The study will help IT practitioners in the public sector learn how to use and manage information technologies to revitalise business processes, improve decision‐making, and gain a competitive advantage from the adoption of e‐government. The proposed architecture framework for e‐government adoption will reduce confusion surrounding e‐government infrastructure in the public sector through understanding the implementation processes, identifying requirements of information and communications technology tools, highlighting the importance of the organisational management resources and the impact of barriers. Design/methodology/approach – A range of earlier studies have been critically examined and analysed to provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government adoption that can address and identify the standards, infrastructure components, applications, and technologies for e‐government. The authors have divided the architecture framework into four layers; access layer, e‐government layer, e‐business layer, and infrastructure layer; each layer addresses a particular aspect of e‐government architecture. This paper then presents a critical analysis of barriers experienced in public sector organisations, which prevent the successful adoption of e‐government; such barriers being presented in a taxonomy. Findings – Defined organisational and technological requirements that will be necessary for the adoption of e‐government in public sector organisations through construct an integrated architecture framework for e‐government. The difficulties and barriers that have been experienced in public sector organisations which complicate the implementation process of e‐government have been analysed and then identified and presented in a taxonomy. Originality/value – The paper provides architecture framework for e‐government adoption that can help to guide IT managers recognise the technological and organisational requirements for e‐government adoption in public sector organisations. The framework can also help the decision makers to set a vision statement and strategic action plan for future direction in the information technology age through identifying key elements and stages for action. The authors also identify and classify the perceived barriers that might complicate the implementation process of e‐government projects. The awareness of these barriers is important for any e‐government project since they will alert the e‐government project team with any problems or challenges might be existed during the implementation process so they will be ready to overcome them. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Business Process Management Journal Emerald Publishing

E‐government adoption: architecture and barriers

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1463-7154
DOI
10.1108/14637150510619902
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – To provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government that represents the alignment of IT infrastructure with business process management in public sector organisations and classify the barriers that might complicate the implementation of the proposed architecture framework. The study will help IT practitioners in the public sector learn how to use and manage information technologies to revitalise business processes, improve decision‐making, and gain a competitive advantage from the adoption of e‐government. The proposed architecture framework for e‐government adoption will reduce confusion surrounding e‐government infrastructure in the public sector through understanding the implementation processes, identifying requirements of information and communications technology tools, highlighting the importance of the organisational management resources and the impact of barriers. Design/methodology/approach – A range of earlier studies have been critically examined and analysed to provide an integrated architecture framework for e‐government adoption that can address and identify the standards, infrastructure components, applications, and technologies for e‐government. The authors have divided the architecture framework into four layers; access layer, e‐government layer, e‐business layer, and infrastructure layer; each layer addresses a particular aspect of e‐government architecture. This paper then presents a critical analysis of barriers experienced in public sector organisations, which prevent the successful adoption of e‐government; such barriers being presented in a taxonomy. Findings – Defined organisational and technological requirements that will be necessary for the adoption of e‐government in public sector organisations through construct an integrated architecture framework for e‐government. The difficulties and barriers that have been experienced in public sector organisations which complicate the implementation process of e‐government have been analysed and then identified and presented in a taxonomy. Originality/value – The paper provides architecture framework for e‐government adoption that can help to guide IT managers recognise the technological and organisational requirements for e‐government adoption in public sector organisations. The framework can also help the decision makers to set a vision statement and strategic action plan for future direction in the information technology age through identifying key elements and stages for action. The authors also identify and classify the perceived barriers that might complicate the implementation process of e‐government projects. The awareness of these barriers is important for any e‐government project since they will alert the e‐government project team with any problems or challenges might be existed during the implementation process so they will be ready to overcome them.

Journal

Business Process Management JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2005

Keywords: Government data processing; Public sector organizations; Computer applications

References

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