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Drivers and motivators in consumer handwashing behavior

Drivers and motivators in consumer handwashing behavior Purpose – A study was conducted at a small university in the American Southwest. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of a four‐year campaign implemented by the university's health services department. The campaign consisted of posting signs in lavatories across campus, reminding students, faculty, and staff to wash their hands after using the facilities. Design/methodology/approach – In 2012, researchers conducted a traditional online survey embedded in a university‐wide weekly electronic newsletter. Both students and employees at the participating university were recruited for the study. The sample represented members of the community with potential exposure to the handwashing promotion campaign as described above, as well as to the health risks associated with varying practices of sanitation behaviors among members of a public institution. Findings – Results indicated participants generally believed in the positive outcomes of handwashing practices. Further, they did not agree that handwashing practices would result in negative outcomes. As for self‐reported hand sanitization practices, participants relied more on handwashing than using alcohol‐based sanitizer to sanitize hands in all instances. Originality/value – Members of the institution reported having positive beliefs and attitude toward handwashing provide a strong basis for an effective handwashing promotion campaign. The emphasis on positive outcomes of adequate and proper handwashing, however, still needs to continue. Therefore, continuing education for the institution's members on the positive outcomes of handwashing can further enhance their attitude and the sense of responsibility to wash their hands as frequently as needed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

Drivers and motivators in consumer handwashing behavior

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/NFS-01-2013-0010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – A study was conducted at a small university in the American Southwest. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of a four‐year campaign implemented by the university's health services department. The campaign consisted of posting signs in lavatories across campus, reminding students, faculty, and staff to wash their hands after using the facilities. Design/methodology/approach – In 2012, researchers conducted a traditional online survey embedded in a university‐wide weekly electronic newsletter. Both students and employees at the participating university were recruited for the study. The sample represented members of the community with potential exposure to the handwashing promotion campaign as described above, as well as to the health risks associated with varying practices of sanitation behaviors among members of a public institution. Findings – Results indicated participants generally believed in the positive outcomes of handwashing practices. Further, they did not agree that handwashing practices would result in negative outcomes. As for self‐reported hand sanitization practices, participants relied more on handwashing than using alcohol‐based sanitizer to sanitize hands in all instances. Originality/value – Members of the institution reported having positive beliefs and attitude toward handwashing provide a strong basis for an effective handwashing promotion campaign. The emphasis on positive outcomes of adequate and proper handwashing, however, still needs to continue. Therefore, continuing education for the institution's members on the positive outcomes of handwashing can further enhance their attitude and the sense of responsibility to wash their hands as frequently as needed.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 25, 2013

Keywords: Consumer behaviour; Disease

References