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Downwash Behind Wings of Finite Span

Downwash Behind Wings of Finite Span WHEN considering a flat plate of finite width at a low angle of attack, it is observed that, downstream from the plate, where the air flow from the suction and pressure sides join, a transverse velocity appears. On the pressure side there is an outward flow toward the ends of the plate, while on the suction surface the component is inward. Since all streamlines have the same origin, in the case of steady flow the pressure where the flow over upper and lower surfaces joins must be the same and no velocity jump is possible. It follows then that any velocity change must be purely transverse and that this will extend to the ends of the plate. The same phenomenon occurs with wings of finite span and the vortices are formed continually in flight. These vortices absorb energy, for which power has to be supplied continuouslyin other words the induced drag caused solely by the vortex formation appears. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Downwash Behind Wings of Finite Span

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 19 (8): 5 – Aug 1, 1947

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb031537
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

WHEN considering a flat plate of finite width at a low angle of attack, it is observed that, downstream from the plate, where the air flow from the suction and pressure sides join, a transverse velocity appears. On the pressure side there is an outward flow toward the ends of the plate, while on the suction surface the component is inward. Since all streamlines have the same origin, in the case of steady flow the pressure where the flow over upper and lower surfaces joins must be the same and no velocity jump is possible. It follows then that any velocity change must be purely transverse and that this will extend to the ends of the plate. The same phenomenon occurs with wings of finite span and the vortices are formed continually in flight. These vortices absorb energy, for which power has to be supplied continuouslyin other words the induced drag caused solely by the vortex formation appears.

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1947

There are no references for this article.