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DOStips

DOStips Mark Bendig Microcomputer Specialist OCLC Database Publishing Section Tak e a Number Beepe r Here's a little tidbit I came up with the Here's one of the simplest batch files you'll hard way a few weeks ago. I was backing ever see that actually can be used for up my hard disk, making a neat pile of something. The file, called B.BAT, contains diskettes as the BACKUP program filled only the following line: them with data. I decided to label them (# ECHO ˆG 1, #2, etc.) after the BACKUP process was When you run this file by entering B at the complete. Suddenly, an imaginary mouse DOS prompt, the computer will beep. No skittered across my desk, followed by my big deal, you say? Actually, this file can be very real, bounding cat. Disks flew every­ quite handy in certain circumstances. For where! Once the dust settled, I realized I example, if you develop your own soft­ had a problem. Which disks were which? ware, you can start your compiler from Recent versions of the RESTORE pro­ the DOS prompt, then (using the built-in gram will identify an out-of-sequence type-ahead capability of the PC) type B backup disk and prompt you to insert the and press <RETURN>. Now you can turn correct one, but wh o wants to insert disk to other work while the compiler grinds after disk looking for the right one? There away, which can be quite a while (some of must be a better way, and here it is! my C programs have taken 15 minutes to Each backup disk contains, in addition compile). When the compiler is done, DOS to your data, a file called BACKUPID.@@@, will get your B command and the PC will which is a binary file written by the beep, signaling you that the compiler is BACKUP command. Among other things, finished. The same technique could be this file contains the sequence number of used with any time-consuming program the disk. To read it, put the backup disk­ you run from the DOS prompt. You can ette into the drive (I will assume drive A) also use the ECHO ˆG line within a batch and enter DEBUG A:BACKUPID.@@@ at file to signal completion of specific stages the DOS prompt. Remember that the pro­ of commands. gram file DEBUG.COM from your DOS I named the file B so mat typing the distribution disk must be in the current name ahead of the PC would use up as directory or in a directory with a PATH few spaces as possible in the keyboard set to it. When you see the DEBUG buffer. If that's not important to you, prompt (a hyphen), type D (for Dump) and name the file BEEP.BAT, making it easier press <RETURN>. You should see a lot of to identify. Note: The ˆG in the ECHO 2-digit hexadecimal numbers. The second command is not really a circumflex (ˆ) fol­ 2-digit number on the first row of the out­ lowed by a G; it's the echo that displays put is the sequence number (in hexadeci­ when you press <CTRL> and g while en­ mal) of the diskette in the disk drive. (If tering the batch file. Some word proces­ you don't know how to convert hexadeci­ sors don't let you enter this character mal numbers to decimal, see p . 28.) To directly, so it's probably best to enter this exit DEBUG, type Q (for Quit) and press one-line file directly from the console <RETURN>. using the COPY CON method. Alter­ The happy ending to my story? I labeled natively, the DOS editor EDLIN accepts each disk as I checked its BACKUPID.@@@ the ˆG character, provided the ˆV com­ file, then put them out of harm's way. Now mand is given first. if I could just build a better mousetrap.... OCLC Micro Vol. 4, No. 2 April 1988 7 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png OCLC Micro Emerald Publishing

DOStips

OCLC Micro , Volume 4 (2): 1 – Feb 1, 1988

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
8756-5196
DOI
10.1108/eb055885
Publisher site
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Abstract

Mark Bendig Microcomputer Specialist OCLC Database Publishing Section Tak e a Number Beepe r Here's a little tidbit I came up with the Here's one of the simplest batch files you'll hard way a few weeks ago. I was backing ever see that actually can be used for up my hard disk, making a neat pile of something. The file, called B.BAT, contains diskettes as the BACKUP program filled only the following line: them with data. I decided to label them (# ECHO ˆG 1, #2, etc.) after the BACKUP process was When you run this file by entering B at the complete. Suddenly, an imaginary mouse DOS prompt, the computer will beep. No skittered across my desk, followed by my big deal, you say? Actually, this file can be very real, bounding cat. Disks flew every­ quite handy in certain circumstances. For where! Once the dust settled, I realized I example, if you develop your own soft­ had a problem. Which disks were which? ware, you can start your compiler from Recent versions of the RESTORE pro­ the DOS prompt, then (using the built-in gram will identify an out-of-sequence type-ahead capability of the PC) type B backup disk and prompt you to insert the and press <RETURN>. Now you can turn correct one, but wh o wants to insert disk to other work while the compiler grinds after disk looking for the right one? There away, which can be quite a while (some of must be a better way, and here it is! my C programs have taken 15 minutes to Each backup disk contains, in addition compile). When the compiler is done, DOS to your data, a file called BACKUPID.@@@, will get your B command and the PC will which is a binary file written by the beep, signaling you that the compiler is BACKUP command. Among other things, finished. The same technique could be this file contains the sequence number of used with any time-consuming program the disk. To read it, put the backup disk­ you run from the DOS prompt. You can ette into the drive (I will assume drive A) also use the ECHO ˆG line within a batch and enter DEBUG A:BACKUPID.@@@ at file to signal completion of specific stages the DOS prompt. Remember that the pro­ of commands. gram file DEBUG.COM from your DOS I named the file B so mat typing the distribution disk must be in the current name ahead of the PC would use up as directory or in a directory with a PATH few spaces as possible in the keyboard set to it. When you see the DEBUG buffer. If that's not important to you, prompt (a hyphen), type D (for Dump) and name the file BEEP.BAT, making it easier press <RETURN>. You should see a lot of to identify. Note: The ˆG in the ECHO 2-digit hexadecimal numbers. The second command is not really a circumflex (ˆ) fol­ 2-digit number on the first row of the out­ lowed by a G; it's the echo that displays put is the sequence number (in hexadeci­ when you press <CTRL> and g while en­ mal) of the diskette in the disk drive. (If tering the batch file. Some word proces­ you don't know how to convert hexadeci­ sors don't let you enter this character mal numbers to decimal, see p . 28.) To directly, so it's probably best to enter this exit DEBUG, type Q (for Quit) and press one-line file directly from the console <RETURN>. using the COPY CON method. Alter­ The happy ending to my story? I labeled natively, the DOS editor EDLIN accepts each disk as I checked its BACKUPID.@@@ the ˆG character, provided the ˆV com­ file, then put them out of harm's way. Now mand is given first. if I could just build a better mousetrap.... OCLC Micro Vol. 4, No. 2 April 1988 7

Journal

OCLC MicroEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 1988

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