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DOStips

DOStips Mark Bendig Microcomputer Specialist OCLC Office of Research COPY Bu g i n DOS 2.1 word processor (e.g., to address an enve­ lope). The easiest way to do this is to use PC users who deal with large numbers of the COPY command. At the DOS prompt, files using the DOS COPY command simply enter COPY CON PRN and press should be aware of an obscure bug in DOS <RETURN>. version 2.1. If you use the "•.» " wildcard This is a special use of the COPY specification (meaning "all files in the cur­ command that allows you to copy be­ rent directory") to copy more than 256 tween devices (CON is the CONsole key­ files, every 256th file will not actually be board, PRN is the PRiNter) rather than be­ copied. What's worse, if you delete the tween files. After you enter the command, original files after the copying is complete, start typing (be sure to press <RETURN> that 256th file is gone forever! And who is after every line you type). You can correct going to notice one missing file among errors within the line you are working on more than 250? That is, until the program by using the <BACKSPACE> key, but that uses that file misbehaves unexpect­ once you press <RETURN>, you are stuck edly, or until you actually need to update with that line the way it is. last month's circulation statistics report. Your typing will be echoed to the The "solution"? If you have a direc­ screen as you proceed, but nothing will tory that's getting crammed full of files, appear on the printer until you are done. consider subdividing it. (DOS 3.2 does not To finish, press the <F6> key, then the have this bug.) <RETURN>. The text will then print out. Hint: Press <CTRL><L> to enter a form feed character, then press <F6> if you Simplified Time Entry want the printer to go to the next page Depending on how your PC is configured, after the printout is complete. you may find yourself entering the date and time every time you start up or reboot the system. There is a little-known feature of DOS versions 3.0 and later that can save you (at least those of you who are hunt- and-peck typists) a few milliseconds during this process: use a period instead of a colon between the hours and minutes. In­ stead of "9:05", for example, you may en­ ter "9.05". Similarly, "14:38" may be en­ tered as "14.38". (Yes, you still have to deal with 24-hour time.) WARNING: This trick does not appear to work on the IBM PC-AT! PC Become s Typewriter Every now and then, the need arises to use the PC as a typewriter; that is, to type straight through from the keyboard to the printer without creating a file or using a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png OCLC Micro Emerald Publishing

DOStips

OCLC Micro , Volume 2 (4): 1 – Apr 1, 1986

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
8756-5196
DOI
10.1108/eb055782
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mark Bendig Microcomputer Specialist OCLC Office of Research COPY Bu g i n DOS 2.1 word processor (e.g., to address an enve­ lope). The easiest way to do this is to use PC users who deal with large numbers of the COPY command. At the DOS prompt, files using the DOS COPY command simply enter COPY CON PRN and press should be aware of an obscure bug in DOS <RETURN>. version 2.1. If you use the "•.» " wildcard This is a special use of the COPY specification (meaning "all files in the cur­ command that allows you to copy be­ rent directory") to copy more than 256 tween devices (CON is the CONsole key­ files, every 256th file will not actually be board, PRN is the PRiNter) rather than be­ copied. What's worse, if you delete the tween files. After you enter the command, original files after the copying is complete, start typing (be sure to press <RETURN> that 256th file is gone forever! And who is after every line you type). You can correct going to notice one missing file among errors within the line you are working on more than 250? That is, until the program by using the <BACKSPACE> key, but that uses that file misbehaves unexpect­ once you press <RETURN>, you are stuck edly, or until you actually need to update with that line the way it is. last month's circulation statistics report. Your typing will be echoed to the The "solution"? If you have a direc­ screen as you proceed, but nothing will tory that's getting crammed full of files, appear on the printer until you are done. consider subdividing it. (DOS 3.2 does not To finish, press the <F6> key, then the have this bug.) <RETURN>. The text will then print out. Hint: Press <CTRL><L> to enter a form feed character, then press <F6> if you Simplified Time Entry want the printer to go to the next page Depending on how your PC is configured, after the printout is complete. you may find yourself entering the date and time every time you start up or reboot the system. There is a little-known feature of DOS versions 3.0 and later that can save you (at least those of you who are hunt- and-peck typists) a few milliseconds during this process: use a period instead of a colon between the hours and minutes. In­ stead of "9:05", for example, you may en­ ter "9.05". Similarly, "14:38" may be en­ tered as "14.38". (Yes, you still have to deal with 24-hour time.) WARNING: This trick does not appear to work on the IBM PC-AT! PC Become s Typewriter Every now and then, the need arises to use the PC as a typewriter; that is, to type straight through from the keyboard to the printer without creating a file or using a

Journal

OCLC MicroEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 1, 1986

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