Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Don’t count them out: PhD skills development and careers in industry

Don’t count them out: PhD skills development and careers in industry The purpose of this study is to identify what skills gained during PhD study are linked with preparation and differences between industry and academic positions.Design/methodology/approachUsing student-level data from nearly 2,400 early career PhD alumni from 50 US PhD granting institutions, this study uses a generalized ordered logit model with partial proportional odds to test the main and conditional effects of 14 areas of skill development on perceptions of career preparation.FindingsThis study contributes empirical evidence to show that research skills and communicating with non-technical audiences are positively linked with job preparation.Practical implicationsThe combination of sophisticated research and noncognitive skills promotes the idea of a well-rounded PhD – a highly skilled and versatile researcher that can interact in both academic and industry settings – as a goal of doctoral education. The knowledge gained from this study will assist scholars and graduate educators, including faculty advisors, program directors, graduate deans, graduate education professionals and career development professionals to reconceptualize professional preparation for work in industry.Social implicationsFor-profit businesses, particularly start-up companies, are vital for economic development and many require PhD-level employees across research and management roles. Developing PhDs with the appropriate skills for industry will better align higher education and economic interests.Originality/valueThe wide scope of doctoral institutions allows for a quantitative approach not appropriate for single-institution case studies of doctoral career pathways research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education Emerald Publishing

Don’t count them out: PhD skills development and careers in industry

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/don-t-count-them-out-phd-skills-development-and-careers-in-industry-Gm9g04qo62

References (92)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2398-4686
DOI
10.1108/sgpe-03-2020-0019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to identify what skills gained during PhD study are linked with preparation and differences between industry and academic positions.Design/methodology/approachUsing student-level data from nearly 2,400 early career PhD alumni from 50 US PhD granting institutions, this study uses a generalized ordered logit model with partial proportional odds to test the main and conditional effects of 14 areas of skill development on perceptions of career preparation.FindingsThis study contributes empirical evidence to show that research skills and communicating with non-technical audiences are positively linked with job preparation.Practical implicationsThe combination of sophisticated research and noncognitive skills promotes the idea of a well-rounded PhD – a highly skilled and versatile researcher that can interact in both academic and industry settings – as a goal of doctoral education. The knowledge gained from this study will assist scholars and graduate educators, including faculty advisors, program directors, graduate deans, graduate education professionals and career development professionals to reconceptualize professional preparation for work in industry.Social implicationsFor-profit businesses, particularly start-up companies, are vital for economic development and many require PhD-level employees across research and management roles. Developing PhDs with the appropriate skills for industry will better align higher education and economic interests.Originality/valueThe wide scope of doctoral institutions allows for a quantitative approach not appropriate for single-institution case studies of doctoral career pathways research.

Journal

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral EducationEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 2, 2021

Keywords: STEM; Human capital theory; Doctoral education; Career development; Noncognitive skills; Workforce transition

There are no references for this article.