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Doing neoliberal things with words in libraries

Doing neoliberal things with words in libraries PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to flesh out a truncated line of analysis in library and information science (LIS) of language analyses of power in the field.Design/methodology/approachLiterature-based conceptual analysis of the problems engendered by neoliberalism in LIS and the productive approach of language analysis of Austin, Habermas, and Smith that allows us to account for neoliberalism’s effects in language and practices – doing things with words.FindingsLIS has engaged a productive postmodern analysis of power relations that reflects social and economic progress, but Austin, Habermas, and Smith offer a sensible, practical explanation for the operation of neoliberal hegemony on the practices of librarianship.Originality/valuePostmodern analyses are now being deployed in portions of LIS, but they fail to account for the full implications of the dominant public language (and policy and practices) of neoliberalism for librarianship. This is productive exploration of those implications to correct and round out those analyses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Documentation Emerald Publishing

Doing neoliberal things with words in libraries

Journal of Documentation , Volume 73 (4): 23 – Jul 10, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0022-0418
DOI
10.1108/JD-11-2016-0134
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to flesh out a truncated line of analysis in library and information science (LIS) of language analyses of power in the field.Design/methodology/approachLiterature-based conceptual analysis of the problems engendered by neoliberalism in LIS and the productive approach of language analysis of Austin, Habermas, and Smith that allows us to account for neoliberalism’s effects in language and practices – doing things with words.FindingsLIS has engaged a productive postmodern analysis of power relations that reflects social and economic progress, but Austin, Habermas, and Smith offer a sensible, practical explanation for the operation of neoliberal hegemony on the practices of librarianship.Originality/valuePostmodern analyses are now being deployed in portions of LIS, but they fail to account for the full implications of the dominant public language (and policy and practices) of neoliberalism for librarianship. This is productive exploration of those implications to correct and round out those analyses.

Journal

Journal of DocumentationEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 10, 2017

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