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Does diet protect against Parkinson's disease? Part 3 – fruit, vegetables and grains

Does diet protect against Parkinson's disease? Part 3 – fruit, vegetables and grains Parkinson's disease is an age‐related brain disease which is currently incurable. The long period during which damage occurs but symptoms are not evident is a focus of research with an aim to finding ways of reducing damage. This paper is the third in a series of diet and PD and covers the evidence for a role of fruit, vegetables and grains in the development of PD. Evidence is not conclusive but suggests that increasing the consumption of fruit, vegetables and grains may reduce the incidence of PD. A small number of studies have found a positive association between fruit and vegetables and PD but this may be due to chemical contamination. There is a need for further research to be carried out, preferably as part of a large ongoing study, rather than using retospective data, with its inherent bias. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nutrition & Food Science Emerald Publishing

Does diet protect against Parkinson's disease? Part 3 – fruit, vegetables and grains

Nutrition & Food Science , Volume 34 (5): 4 – Oct 1, 2004

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0034-6659
DOI
10.1108/00346650410560352
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Parkinson's disease is an age‐related brain disease which is currently incurable. The long period during which damage occurs but symptoms are not evident is a focus of research with an aim to finding ways of reducing damage. This paper is the third in a series of diet and PD and covers the evidence for a role of fruit, vegetables and grains in the development of PD. Evidence is not conclusive but suggests that increasing the consumption of fruit, vegetables and grains may reduce the incidence of PD. A small number of studies have found a positive association between fruit and vegetables and PD but this may be due to chemical contamination. There is a need for further research to be carried out, preferably as part of a large ongoing study, rather than using retospective data, with its inherent bias.

Journal

Nutrition & Food ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 1, 2004

Keywords: Diet; Diseases; Lifestyles; Fruits; Vegetables

References