Does college students’ social media use affect school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement?

Does college students’ social media use affect school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement? PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine how college students’ social media use affects their school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement.Design/methodology/approachThe study employed face-to-face interviews and self-administered survey/quantitative data.FindingsCommunication and business students are more involved on campus and likely to use social media as the primary communication medium than other majors. Social media and text messages are not the culprits of school e-mail avoidance. University departments, student organizations, and faculty advisors’ e-mails are most likely to be avoided. Social media users can be categorized as either “instant communicators” or “online content curators.” Facebook is the only social media brand conducive to campus involvement.Research limitations/implicationsThis study only used one university’s students as sample. In examining school e-mail avoidance, it only focused on the source of e-mail. The study is limited by its sole reliance on quantitative behavioral data.Practical implicationsUniversity administrators and academic advisors need to reconsider the e-mail communication to students, target at the instant communicator social media users, and use Facebook to create a strong sense of community and campus involvement for their students. Marketers can utilize the two social media user groups in selecting social media in targeting to students.Originality/valueThe study offered empirical evidence to explain how social media affect students’ school e-mail avoidance and the role of campus media and specific social media outlet on campus involvement. It advances the knowledge of media choice of students and the social media user groups. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Internet Research Emerald Publishing

Does college students’ social media use affect school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement?

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
1066-2243
DOI
10.1108/IntR-11-2016-0346
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine how college students’ social media use affects their school e-mail avoidance and campus involvement.Design/methodology/approachThe study employed face-to-face interviews and self-administered survey/quantitative data.FindingsCommunication and business students are more involved on campus and likely to use social media as the primary communication medium than other majors. Social media and text messages are not the culprits of school e-mail avoidance. University departments, student organizations, and faculty advisors’ e-mails are most likely to be avoided. Social media users can be categorized as either “instant communicators” or “online content curators.” Facebook is the only social media brand conducive to campus involvement.Research limitations/implicationsThis study only used one university’s students as sample. In examining school e-mail avoidance, it only focused on the source of e-mail. The study is limited by its sole reliance on quantitative behavioral data.Practical implicationsUniversity administrators and academic advisors need to reconsider the e-mail communication to students, target at the instant communicator social media users, and use Facebook to create a strong sense of community and campus involvement for their students. Marketers can utilize the two social media user groups in selecting social media in targeting to students.Originality/valueThe study offered empirical evidence to explain how social media affect students’ school e-mail avoidance and the role of campus media and specific social media outlet on campus involvement. It advances the knowledge of media choice of students and the social media user groups.

Journal

Internet ResearchEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 6, 2018

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