Do they stay or do they go? A longitudinal study of intentions to leave and exclusion from working life among targets of workplace bullying

Do they stay or do they go? A longitudinal study of intentions to leave and exclusion from... Purpose – This study aims to explore relationships between exposure to bullying at work and intention to leave the organisation, actual leaving the workplace, and exclusion from working life through sick leave or rehabilitation or disability pension. Design/methodology/approach – A prospective design with two surveys of a national representative sample of the Norwegian work force was used ( n =1,775). The response rate at the first data collection in 2005 was 56.4 per cent, and 70 per cent at the second data collection in 2007. Bullying was measured using two measurement methods: self‐labelled victims of bullying and exposure to bullying behaviour, respectively. Findings – This study shows partial support for Leymann's assumption that bullying at work will lead to exclusion from working life. Logistic regressions showed that victims of bullying considered leaving their work more often than did individuals who were not bullied, on both measurement times. The results also showed that victims have changed employer more often than non‐victims. However, most victims are still working full time or part time two years later. Practical implications – Prevention of workplace bullying must be handled through procedures on an organisational level. Rehabilitation programs and reintegration must be offered for employees unable to stay in their job. Counselling should be available for those who experience bullying or consider leaving their job. Originality/value – To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study examining bullying, intention to leave, turnover and exclusion from working life with a prospective longitudinal design. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Manpower Emerald Publishing

Do they stay or do they go? A longitudinal study of intentions to leave and exclusion from working life among targets of workplace bullying

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0143-7720
DOI
10.1108/01437721111130198
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to explore relationships between exposure to bullying at work and intention to leave the organisation, actual leaving the workplace, and exclusion from working life through sick leave or rehabilitation or disability pension. Design/methodology/approach – A prospective design with two surveys of a national representative sample of the Norwegian work force was used ( n =1,775). The response rate at the first data collection in 2005 was 56.4 per cent, and 70 per cent at the second data collection in 2007. Bullying was measured using two measurement methods: self‐labelled victims of bullying and exposure to bullying behaviour, respectively. Findings – This study shows partial support for Leymann's assumption that bullying at work will lead to exclusion from working life. Logistic regressions showed that victims of bullying considered leaving their work more often than did individuals who were not bullied, on both measurement times. The results also showed that victims have changed employer more often than non‐victims. However, most victims are still working full time or part time two years later. Practical implications – Prevention of workplace bullying must be handled through procedures on an organisational level. Rehabilitation programs and reintegration must be offered for employees unable to stay in their job. Counselling should be available for those who experience bullying or consider leaving their job. Originality/value – To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study examining bullying, intention to leave, turnover and exclusion from working life with a prospective longitudinal design.

Journal

International Journal of ManpowerEmerald Publishing

Published: May 10, 2011

Keywords: Bullying; Employee turnover; Norway; Employee behaviour

References

  • Workplace victimization: aggression from the target's perspective
    Aquino, K.; Thau, S.
  • Shocks as causes of turnover: what they are and how organizations can manage them
    Holtom, B.C.; Mitchell, T.R.; Lee, T.W.; Inderrieden, E.J.
  • Perceptions and experience of workplace bullying in five different working populations
    Jennifer, D.; Cowie, H.; Ananiadou, K.
  • The occurrences and correlates of bullying and harassment in the restaurant sector
    Mathisen, G.E.; Einarsen, S.; Mykletun, R.
  • Relationships between exposure to bullying at work and psychological and psychosomatic health complaints: the role of state negative affectivity and generalized self‐efficacy
    Mikkelsen, E.G.; Einarsen, S.

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