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Do Millennials prefer to be shown appreciation differently?

Do Millennials prefer to be shown appreciation differently? Research demonstrates that feeling appreciated in the workplace increases employee engagement, reduces turnover, and increases profitability. Despite the fact that people differ in how they feel most appreciated, no work to date has explored the impact of age differences on appreciation preferences. The purpose of this paper is to determine if Millennial workers vs their older colleagues differ in the manner they prefer to be shown appreciation.Design/methodology/approachFrom 2014 to 2018, 62,156 workers completed the Motivating by Appreciation Inventory (White, 2011) and provided age, gender, and work industry information. Each person’s primary and the least valued languages of appreciation in the workplace were identified. Four age groups were created of approximately equal numbers: ≤29-, 30-39-, 40-49-, and 50+ years old.FindingsWords of Affirmation was the most prominent primary language of appreciation across all four age groups and most pronounced in the oldest group (50+). The ≤29-year-old group valued Quality Time more and Acts of Service less than the other three age groups. There were no age group differences in the least valued language of appreciation.Practical implicationsThe results suggest that supervisors and staff members must be mindful to include opportunities for quality time interactions with Millennial workers, as well as provide words of affirmation, to show appreciation for their work.Originality/valueThis is the first study to assess age differences in preferred ways to be shown appreciation in the workplace. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management International Digest Emerald Publishing

Do Millennials prefer to be shown appreciation differently?

Human Resource Management International Digest , Volume 26 (5): 5 – Jul 24, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0967-0734
DOI
10.1108/hrmid-04-2018-0065
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research demonstrates that feeling appreciated in the workplace increases employee engagement, reduces turnover, and increases profitability. Despite the fact that people differ in how they feel most appreciated, no work to date has explored the impact of age differences on appreciation preferences. The purpose of this paper is to determine if Millennial workers vs their older colleagues differ in the manner they prefer to be shown appreciation.Design/methodology/approachFrom 2014 to 2018, 62,156 workers completed the Motivating by Appreciation Inventory (White, 2011) and provided age, gender, and work industry information. Each person’s primary and the least valued languages of appreciation in the workplace were identified. Four age groups were created of approximately equal numbers: ≤29-, 30-39-, 40-49-, and 50+ years old.FindingsWords of Affirmation was the most prominent primary language of appreciation across all four age groups and most pronounced in the oldest group (50+). The ≤29-year-old group valued Quality Time more and Acts of Service less than the other three age groups. There were no age group differences in the least valued language of appreciation.Practical implicationsThe results suggest that supervisors and staff members must be mindful to include opportunities for quality time interactions with Millennial workers, as well as provide words of affirmation, to show appreciation for their work.Originality/valueThis is the first study to assess age differences in preferred ways to be shown appreciation in the workplace.

Journal

Human Resource Management International DigestEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 24, 2018

Keywords: Recognition; Millennials; Appreciation; Age differences; Generational; Motivating by appreciation inventory

References