Do consumers discern innovations in service elements?

Do consumers discern innovations in service elements? Purpose – The success of service innovation programs rests on whether consumers discern the novelties built into service offerings. Hence, service firms must base the evaluation of innovation programs on customer attitude in addition to internal measures. The study examines whether consumers are capable of discerning the novelties built into service elements, and explores the underlying dimensions therein. Design/methodology/approach – Research contexts include fitness centers and auto repair shops in the USA. A list of tangible and intangible service elements was developed based on a literature review. This list was improved through interviews with service managers and a focus group using frequent customers of each service. A total of 34 items emerged, comprising seven dimensions. These items were administered to 120 students who used each service frequently. Factor analysis supported the seven‐dimension model. Finally, a confirmatory study using 527 professional adults supported these findings. Findings – Respondents were capable of discerning the novelties built into the elements of service offerings. The 32‐item scale included seven dimensions: administration, interior facilities, exterior facilities, employees, service core, technology, and responsiveness. Research limitations/implications – The representativeness of the samples and the two service contexts, and a sole focus on customers' (versus the firm's) subjective perception are the primary limitations. Practical implications – One reason behind new product failures is the mismatch between the service provider's and the consumers' views of innovativeness. The scale provided here can help tap consumer perspective throughout the new product development process. Originality/value – This study can help bridge the gap between service development processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Services Marketing Emerald Publishing

Do consumers discern innovations in service elements?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/do-consumers-discern-innovations-in-service-elements-AcLavIgOHY
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0887-6045
DOI
10.1108/08876040810889111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The success of service innovation programs rests on whether consumers discern the novelties built into service offerings. Hence, service firms must base the evaluation of innovation programs on customer attitude in addition to internal measures. The study examines whether consumers are capable of discerning the novelties built into service elements, and explores the underlying dimensions therein. Design/methodology/approach – Research contexts include fitness centers and auto repair shops in the USA. A list of tangible and intangible service elements was developed based on a literature review. This list was improved through interviews with service managers and a focus group using frequent customers of each service. A total of 34 items emerged, comprising seven dimensions. These items were administered to 120 students who used each service frequently. Factor analysis supported the seven‐dimension model. Finally, a confirmatory study using 527 professional adults supported these findings. Findings – Respondents were capable of discerning the novelties built into the elements of service offerings. The 32‐item scale included seven dimensions: administration, interior facilities, exterior facilities, employees, service core, technology, and responsiveness. Research limitations/implications – The representativeness of the samples and the two service contexts, and a sole focus on customers' (versus the firm's) subjective perception are the primary limitations. Practical implications – One reason behind new product failures is the mismatch between the service provider's and the consumers' views of innovativeness. The scale provided here can help tap consumer perspective throughout the new product development process. Originality/value – This study can help bridge the gap between service development processes.

Journal

Journal of Services MarketingEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 2008

Keywords: Service industries; Innovation; Consumers; Perception; Automotive industry

References

  • A customer‐oriented new services development process
    Alam, I.; Perry, C.
  • Determinants of innovation through a knowledge‐based theory lens
    Aranda, D.A.; Fernandez, L.M.M.
  • An empirically‐based typology of product innovativeness for new financial services: success and failure scenarios
    Avlonitis, G.J.; Papastathaopoulou, P.G.; Gounaris, S.P.
  • Innovative versus incremental new business services: different keys for achieving success
    de Brentani, U.
  • New industrial financial services: what distinguishes the winners
    Cooper, R.G.; de Brentani, U.
  • A critical look at technological innovation typology and innovativeness terminology: a literature review
    Garcia, R.; Calantone, R.
  • New service development: a review of the literature and annotated bibliography
    Johne, A.; Storey, C.
  • Effects of personal control on adoption of self‐service technology innovations
    Lee, J.; Allaway, A.
  • First‐mover advantages in regimes of weak appropriability: the case of financial service innovations
    Lopez, L.E.; Roberts, E.B.
  • Services Marketing
    Lovelock, C.
  • The effect of a market orientation on business profitability
    Narver, J.C.; Slater, S.F.
  • Customer‐led and market‐oriented: let's not confuse the two
    Slater, S.F.; Narver, J.C.
  • Critical development activities for really new versus incremental products
    Song, M.X.; Montoya‐Weiss, M.M.
  • Customer satisfaction: a meta‐analysis of the empirical evidence
    Szymanski, D.M.; Henard, D.H.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off