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Distribution of agricultural productivity gains in selected Feed the Future African countries

Distribution of agricultural productivity gains in selected Feed the Future African countries PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine investments in selected Feed the Future countries in Africa.Design/methodology/approachThe authors examine three investments in Feed the Future countries (e.g. Rwanda and Uganda) in the context of non-traded goods, exports and imports. These investments include research and development in Ugandan cassava production, a value chain intervention in the coffee market channel in Rwanda and a program to increase the use of fertilizer for maize production in Rwanda. The authors also stress the importance of distributional impacts in terms of policymaking.FindingsThe results show that while there can be net gains from each investment discussed, the distributional effects of each are very different.Originality/valueThe findings will be useful for the development community and agribusiness policymaking. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies Emerald Publishing

Distribution of agricultural productivity gains in selected Feed the Future African countries

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2044-0839
DOI
10.1108/JADEE-01-2018-0009
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to examine investments in selected Feed the Future countries in Africa.Design/methodology/approachThe authors examine three investments in Feed the Future countries (e.g. Rwanda and Uganda) in the context of non-traded goods, exports and imports. These investments include research and development in Ugandan cassava production, a value chain intervention in the coffee market channel in Rwanda and a program to increase the use of fertilizer for maize production in Rwanda. The authors also stress the importance of distributional impacts in terms of policymaking.FindingsThe results show that while there can be net gains from each investment discussed, the distributional effects of each are very different.Originality/valueThe findings will be useful for the development community and agribusiness policymaking.

Journal

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging EconomiesEmerald Publishing

Published: May 14, 2019

References