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Diploma Mills: How for-Profit Colleges Stiffed Students, Taxpayers, and the American Dream

Diploma Mills: How for-Profit Colleges Stiffed Students, Taxpayers, and the American Dream Diploma Mills: How for-Profit Colleges Stiffed Students, Taxpayers, and Book reviews the American Dream Edited by A.J. Angulo John Hopkins Press Baltimore, MD xvii+203pp. ISBN: 978-1-42142007-3 Keywords Diploma mills, American dream, For-profit tertiary education Review DOI 10.1108/HER-10-2017-0020 In this extraordinary piece of educational history, A.J. Angulo offers a sweeping account of for-profit tertiary education in the USA, from the initial growth of tertiary educational institutions in the late eighteenth century to the very recent past. The story begins innocuously enough with the well-known growth of business practices, in the history of American capitalism, requiring large numbers of clerks. Entrepreneurial for-profit colleges that from the late eighteenth century onwards taught book-keeping and hand-writing were a clever insertion in the shifting economy. A similar growth – for similar reasons – of for-profit law schools was paralleled, more alarmingly, by the development of a wide range of for-profit medical schools, offering very short diploma courses by which many became medical practitioners. By the 1920s, universities had successfully asserted dominance over these institutions, though the idea of entrepreneurial education never truly receded. In recounting the shifts in this long period, Angulo captures some of the tensions between professional standards and market monopoly that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Education Review Emerald Publishing

Diploma Mills: How for-Profit Colleges Stiffed Students, Taxpayers, and the American Dream

History of Education Review , Volume 47 (1): 2 – Jun 4, 2018

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0819-8691
DOI
10.1108/HER-10-2017-0020
Publisher site
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Abstract

Diploma Mills: How for-Profit Colleges Stiffed Students, Taxpayers, and Book reviews the American Dream Edited by A.J. Angulo John Hopkins Press Baltimore, MD xvii+203pp. ISBN: 978-1-42142007-3 Keywords Diploma mills, American dream, For-profit tertiary education Review DOI 10.1108/HER-10-2017-0020 In this extraordinary piece of educational history, A.J. Angulo offers a sweeping account of for-profit tertiary education in the USA, from the initial growth of tertiary educational institutions in the late eighteenth century to the very recent past. The story begins innocuously enough with the well-known growth of business practices, in the history of American capitalism, requiring large numbers of clerks. Entrepreneurial for-profit colleges that from the late eighteenth century onwards taught book-keeping and hand-writing were a clever insertion in the shifting economy. A similar growth – for similar reasons – of for-profit law schools was paralleled, more alarmingly, by the development of a wide range of for-profit medical schools, offering very short diploma courses by which many became medical practitioners. By the 1920s, universities had successfully asserted dominance over these institutions, though the idea of entrepreneurial education never truly receded. In recounting the shifts in this long period, Angulo captures some of the tensions between professional standards and market monopoly that

Journal

History of Education ReviewEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 4, 2018

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