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Digital inequalities and social media: experiences of young people in Chile

Digital inequalities and social media: experiences of young people in Chile PurposeThis paper aims to report the findings from a survey of secondary school students in Chile by exploring their use of social networking services for information-seeking purposes.Design/methodology/approachAn online survey was distributed via Chile’s Ministry of Education and 12,354 responses were received.FindingsThe results indicate that young people in Chile extensively use SNSs, but there are differences in the ways in which they use these services, specifically for information purposes. When considering school-related activities, there are differences in the use of SNSs by students in different types of schools. Those in academic-focussed institutions are more likely to use SNSs for school-related information purposes and are more likely to publish most types of information on SNSs than their counterparts in vocational schools.Research limitations/implicationsThe sample was self-selecting and excluded students without online access to the survey.Practical implicationsThe findings indicate more needs to be done in schools serving lower socio-economic communities to support students’ use of SNSs for information-seeking, especially for academic purposes.Social implicationsThe findings suggest that school-associated social capital may have a role in shaping students’ use of SNSs for information and learning purposes and, potentially, in exacerbating digital inequalities.Originality/valueThe focus on the use of social media specifically for information-seeking distinguishes this research. The findings challenge possible assumptions about the links between social media use and social class and suggest that differences may be exacerbated by school practices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Information and Learning Science Emerald Publishing

Digital inequalities and social media: experiences of young people in Chile

Information and Learning Science , Volume 118 (7/8): 13 – Jul 10, 2017

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2398-5348
DOI
10.1108/ILS-05-2017-0047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PurposeThis paper aims to report the findings from a survey of secondary school students in Chile by exploring their use of social networking services for information-seeking purposes.Design/methodology/approachAn online survey was distributed via Chile’s Ministry of Education and 12,354 responses were received.FindingsThe results indicate that young people in Chile extensively use SNSs, but there are differences in the ways in which they use these services, specifically for information purposes. When considering school-related activities, there are differences in the use of SNSs by students in different types of schools. Those in academic-focussed institutions are more likely to use SNSs for school-related information purposes and are more likely to publish most types of information on SNSs than their counterparts in vocational schools.Research limitations/implicationsThe sample was self-selecting and excluded students without online access to the survey.Practical implicationsThe findings indicate more needs to be done in schools serving lower socio-economic communities to support students’ use of SNSs for information-seeking, especially for academic purposes.Social implicationsThe findings suggest that school-associated social capital may have a role in shaping students’ use of SNSs for information and learning purposes and, potentially, in exacerbating digital inequalities.Originality/valueThe focus on the use of social media specifically for information-seeking distinguishes this research. The findings challenge possible assumptions about the links between social media use and social class and suggest that differences may be exacerbated by school practices.

Journal

Information and Learning ScienceEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 10, 2017

References