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Digital creativity: learning by story driven digital production

Digital creativity: learning by story driven digital production The goal to stimulate perspective taking and inference making on social phenomena, such as gender roles in society, has proven to be difficult to achieve in general and in particular for primary school students. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to develop creative models and concepts for learning that provide guidance addressing these challenges.Design/methodology/approachA case study methodology, including classroom observations, teacher interviews and analysis of videos created by students, was applied within a large-scale action research project related to cross-border collaboration for educational purposes supported by information and communication technologies among Danish, Norwegian and Swedish schools.FindingsThis study reports on how teachers organized group work for their sixth grades students to reimagine and videoing fairy tales endings of Cinderella in order to explore and learn about gender roles in society in a cross-border setting. The personal, emotional and social negotiations of working with peers and giving feedback to students in other schools from other countries enhanced their learning. Results suggest that adding the framework of boundary object-driven design helps to improve the process by its focus on a shared understanding, common practice and sense-making.Originality/valueThe study incorporates the framework on boundary objects as a “mental design device” into a story-driven digital production project, suggesting that creativity in combination with a specific yet open task for student group work enhances learning in social science. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology Emerald Publishing

Digital creativity: learning by story driven digital production

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
2056-4880
DOI
10.1108/ijilt-11-2018-0129
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The goal to stimulate perspective taking and inference making on social phenomena, such as gender roles in society, has proven to be difficult to achieve in general and in particular for primary school students. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to develop creative models and concepts for learning that provide guidance addressing these challenges.Design/methodology/approachA case study methodology, including classroom observations, teacher interviews and analysis of videos created by students, was applied within a large-scale action research project related to cross-border collaboration for educational purposes supported by information and communication technologies among Danish, Norwegian and Swedish schools.FindingsThis study reports on how teachers organized group work for their sixth grades students to reimagine and videoing fairy tales endings of Cinderella in order to explore and learn about gender roles in society in a cross-border setting. The personal, emotional and social negotiations of working with peers and giving feedback to students in other schools from other countries enhanced their learning. Results suggest that adding the framework of boundary object-driven design helps to improve the process by its focus on a shared understanding, common practice and sense-making.Originality/valueThe study incorporates the framework on boundary objects as a “mental design device” into a story-driven digital production project, suggesting that creativity in combination with a specific yet open task for student group work enhances learning in social science.

Journal

The International Journal of Information and Learning TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: May 20, 2019

Keywords: Gender roles; Social science; Creativity; Story; Digital competence; Digital design

References