Differential effects of male and female managers' non‐verbal emotional skills on employees' ratings

Differential effects of male and female managers' non‐verbal emotional skills on employees'... Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine whether employees are more satisfied with female, as compared to male, managers who accurately perceive non‐verbal emotion expressions, and how male and female managers' non‐verbal emotional skill differentially affects their employees' ratings. Design/methodology/approach – Students, nearly all of whom had work experience, were randomly assigned a vignette and asked to respond to the situation in the role of the employee. The situation described male or female managers either perceiving or not attending to the employees' emotional expression, and using or not using emotional information to be supportive or persuasive. Differences between the various situations were examined. Findings – Participants indicated that they were more satisfied with female, but not male, managers, who accurately perceived their emotion. Similarly, failing to attend to emotion resulted in lower satisfaction ratings for female, but not male, managers. In ways consistent with gender stereotypes, male and female managers' non‐verbal emotion perception had differential effects on their perceived persuasiveness and supportiveness. Research limitations/implications – The use of vignettes with a student sample may limit generalizability. However, satisfactory manipulation checks, strong theoretical support, the work experience of the students, and the established use of vignettes in psychological research together argue for the validity of the findings. Practical implications – Working managers may increase their employees' satisfaction by increasing their accuracy in “reading” emotions and using emotional information in gender‐congruent ways. Originality/value – This paper increases knowledge about the role of emotion perception for working managers and, specifically, how the use of emotional information may have differential value for male and female managers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Managerial Psychology Emerald Publishing

Differential effects of male and female managers' non‐verbal emotional skills on employees' ratings

Journal of Managerial Psychology, Volume 23 (2): 17 – Feb 15, 2008

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0268-3946
DOI
10.1108/02683940810850772
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine whether employees are more satisfied with female, as compared to male, managers who accurately perceive non‐verbal emotion expressions, and how male and female managers' non‐verbal emotional skill differentially affects their employees' ratings. Design/methodology/approach – Students, nearly all of whom had work experience, were randomly assigned a vignette and asked to respond to the situation in the role of the employee. The situation described male or female managers either perceiving or not attending to the employees' emotional expression, and using or not using emotional information to be supportive or persuasive. Differences between the various situations were examined. Findings – Participants indicated that they were more satisfied with female, but not male, managers, who accurately perceived their emotion. Similarly, failing to attend to emotion resulted in lower satisfaction ratings for female, but not male, managers. In ways consistent with gender stereotypes, male and female managers' non‐verbal emotion perception had differential effects on their perceived persuasiveness and supportiveness. Research limitations/implications – The use of vignettes with a student sample may limit generalizability. However, satisfactory manipulation checks, strong theoretical support, the work experience of the students, and the established use of vignettes in psychological research together argue for the validity of the findings. Practical implications – Working managers may increase their employees' satisfaction by increasing their accuracy in “reading” emotions and using emotional information in gender‐congruent ways. Originality/value – This paper increases knowledge about the role of emotion perception for working managers and, specifically, how the use of emotional information may have differential value for male and female managers.

Journal

Journal of Managerial PsychologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Feb 15, 2008

Keywords: Managers; Emotional intelligence; Management skills; Job satisfaction; Gender; Non‐verbal communications

References

  • Men's and women's perceptions of the gender typing of management subroles
    Atwater, L.E.; Brett, J.F.; Waldman, D.; DiMare, L.; Hayden, M.V.
  • The experience and effects of emotional support: what the study of cultural and gender differences can tell us about close relationships, emotion, and interpersonal communication
    Burleson, B.R.
  • The female leadership advantage: an evaluation of the evidence
    Eagly, A.H.; Carli, L.L.
  • Emotional Intelligence
    Goleman, D.
  • Sex, task, and behavioral flexibility effects on leadership perceptions
    Hall, R.J.; Workman, J.W.; Marchioro, C.A.
  • Comparing the validity of multiple social effectiveness constructs in the prediction of managerial job performance
    Sedmar, A.; Robins, G.; Ferris, G.R.

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