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Different roads? Evidence about the changing provision of English social housing

Different roads? Evidence about the changing provision of English social housing Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contextualise and assess “controlled” evidence about emerging plural provision of social housing within an English region. Design/methodology/approach – Two matching pairs of case study social housing provider type (stock transfer associations and arm's‐length management organisations), all established between four and seven years previously and all located within the same region, are compared and contrasted through rich qualitative interviews with stakeholders, backed by secondary and other documentary evidence. Findings – The new models have led to considerable change for both staff and tenants across many dimensions, mainly positive, in service delivery terms. It is also apparent that regulation and inspection have a dominant impact on social providers. It can be inferred from the evidence that a key challenge for the future is the lack of a clear, long‐term vision for social housing at the national policy level. Originality/value – The paper is a rare empirical examination of wide‐ranging change to social housing in the UK. It is also unusual in its attempt to construct a quasi‐experimental series of case studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis Emerald Publishing

Different roads? Evidence about the changing provision of English social housing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1753-8270
DOI
10.1108/17538270910992818
Publisher site
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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to contextualise and assess “controlled” evidence about emerging plural provision of social housing within an English region. Design/methodology/approach – Two matching pairs of case study social housing provider type (stock transfer associations and arm's‐length management organisations), all established between four and seven years previously and all located within the same region, are compared and contrasted through rich qualitative interviews with stakeholders, backed by secondary and other documentary evidence. Findings – The new models have led to considerable change for both staff and tenants across many dimensions, mainly positive, in service delivery terms. It is also apparent that regulation and inspection have a dominant impact on social providers. It can be inferred from the evidence that a key challenge for the future is the lack of a clear, long‐term vision for social housing at the national policy level. Originality/value – The paper is a rare empirical examination of wide‐ranging change to social housing in the UK. It is also unusual in its attempt to construct a quasi‐experimental series of case studies.

Journal

International Journal of Housing Markets and AnalysisEmerald Publishing

Published: Oct 2, 2009

Keywords: Social groups; Housing; Local housing authorities; United Kingdom

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