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Differences in personal and professional tweets of scholars

Differences in personal and professional tweets of scholars Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to show that there were differences in the use of Twitter by professors at AAU schools. Affordance use differed between the personal and professional tweets of professors as categorized by turkers. Framing behaviors were described that could impact the interpretation of tweets by audience members. Design/methodology/approach– A three phase research design was used that included surveys of professors, categorization of tweets by workers in Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, and categorization of tweets by active professors on Twitter. Findings– There were significant differences found between professors that reported having a Twitter account, significant differences found between types of Twitter accounts (personal, professional, or both), and significant differences in the affordances used in personal and professional tweets. Framing behaviors were described that may assist altmetric researchers in distinguishing between personal and professional tweets. Research limitations/implications– The study is limited by the sample population, survey instrument, low survey response rate, and low Cohen’s κ. Practical implications– An overview of various affordances found in Twitter is provided and a novel use of Amazon’s Mechanical Turk for the categorization of tweets is described that can be applied to future altmetric studies. Originality/value– This work utilizes a socio-technical framework integrating social and psychological theories to interpret results from the tweeting behavior of professors and the interpretation of tweets by workers in Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aslib Journal of Information Management Emerald Publishing

Differences in personal and professional tweets of scholars

Aslib Journal of Information Management , Volume 67 (3): 16 – May 18, 2015

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
2050-3806
DOI
10.1108/AJIM-12-2014-0180
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to show that there were differences in the use of Twitter by professors at AAU schools. Affordance use differed between the personal and professional tweets of professors as categorized by turkers. Framing behaviors were described that could impact the interpretation of tweets by audience members. Design/methodology/approach– A three phase research design was used that included surveys of professors, categorization of tweets by workers in Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, and categorization of tweets by active professors on Twitter. Findings– There were significant differences found between professors that reported having a Twitter account, significant differences found between types of Twitter accounts (personal, professional, or both), and significant differences in the affordances used in personal and professional tweets. Framing behaviors were described that may assist altmetric researchers in distinguishing between personal and professional tweets. Research limitations/implications– The study is limited by the sample population, survey instrument, low survey response rate, and low Cohen’s κ. Practical implications– An overview of various affordances found in Twitter is provided and a novel use of Amazon’s Mechanical Turk for the categorization of tweets is described that can be applied to future altmetric studies. Originality/value– This work utilizes a socio-technical framework integrating social and psychological theories to interpret results from the tweeting behavior of professors and the interpretation of tweets by workers in Amazon’s Mechanical Turk.

Journal

Aslib Journal of Information ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: May 18, 2015

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