Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Differences between on‐site and off‐site teams: manager perceptions

Differences between on‐site and off‐site teams: manager perceptions This study investigated managers' perceptions of variables important to successful teams, emphasizing key differences between off‐site and on‐site teams. Changes in perceptions after exposure to a virtual team environment were examined. Key variables examined in this study included reporting procedures, importance of solid work structure, team hierarchy, team leadership, and communication. Findings as to pre‐ and post‐perceptions of the importance of these variables are reported. MBA students, already in managerial jobs, were the subjects, and were expected to duplicate general managerial attitudes. Two statistical tests were used to evaluate the data. First, a test of differences of means for paired observation, n =43, using t ‐statistic; second, a test of association, rated on a Likert scale from 1 to 5, using Pierson's Chi‐square test, were used to evaluate the quantitative part of the study. Conclusions are drawn as to what managers need to focus on when employing virtual teams. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Team Performance Management Emerald Publishing

Differences between on‐site and off‐site teams: manager perceptions

Team Performance Management , Volume 10 (5/6): 6 – Jul 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/differences-between-on-site-and-off-site-teams-manager-perceptions-b8sPRJslwK

References (13)

Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1352-7592
DOI
10.1108/13527590410556854
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated managers' perceptions of variables important to successful teams, emphasizing key differences between off‐site and on‐site teams. Changes in perceptions after exposure to a virtual team environment were examined. Key variables examined in this study included reporting procedures, importance of solid work structure, team hierarchy, team leadership, and communication. Findings as to pre‐ and post‐perceptions of the importance of these variables are reported. MBA students, already in managerial jobs, were the subjects, and were expected to duplicate general managerial attitudes. Two statistical tests were used to evaluate the data. First, a test of differences of means for paired observation, n =43, using t ‐statistic; second, a test of association, rated on a Likert scale from 1 to 5, using Pierson's Chi‐square test, were used to evaluate the quantitative part of the study. Conclusions are drawn as to what managers need to focus on when employing virtual teams.

Journal

Team Performance ManagementEmerald Publishing

Published: Jul 1, 2004

Keywords: Team working; Virtual organizations

There are no references for this article.