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Dietary Awareness of Primary School Children

Dietary Awareness of Primary School Children The dietary awareness of primary school children towards selectedfood items and components including bread, potatoes, dairy products,fat, fish, meat, fresh fruit, salt, sugar and sweets was evaluated usingan interview technique. The children were asked whether they ought toeat more, the same or less of each food and the results are presentedfor the sample of younger and older children. The results indicate thatthese selected food items can be broken down into three main areas.First there are those where the majority of children thought we ought toincrease consumption bread, potatoes, dairy products, fish, meat andfresh fruit. Second there is a group of food components including salt,fat and sugar in which there is closer similarity in those advocatingmore or less consumption. Third there are the food products such assweets where there are significant differences between age groups, andchanges in attitude occur in a limited age span. A discussion of theimplications of this work for nutrition education, new food productdevelopment and socioeconomic policy is presented together withrecommendations for future research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

Dietary Awareness of Primary School Children

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/EUM0000000002348
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The dietary awareness of primary school children towards selectedfood items and components including bread, potatoes, dairy products,fat, fish, meat, fresh fruit, salt, sugar and sweets was evaluated usingan interview technique. The children were asked whether they ought toeat more, the same or less of each food and the results are presentedfor the sample of younger and older children. The results indicate thatthese selected food items can be broken down into three main areas.First there are those where the majority of children thought we ought toincrease consumption bread, potatoes, dairy products, fish, meat andfresh fruit. Second there is a group of food components including salt,fat and sugar in which there is closer similarity in those advocatingmore or less consumption. Third there are the food products such assweets where there are significant differences between age groups, andchanges in attitude occur in a limited age span. A discussion of theimplications of this work for nutrition education, new food productdevelopment and socioeconomic policy is presented together withrecommendations for future research.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 1991

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