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DEVELOPING ACTIVE COMPLIANCE ROBOT ARMS

DEVELOPING ACTIVE COMPLIANCE ROBOT ARMS A large subset of operations in which robotic arms have consistently failed to achieve their potential are those which require the robot to interact with the environment e.g. assembly, drilling, fettling. Such tasks require force control or active compliance to either control or limit the interactions. Some of these problems can be circumvented by clever mechanical design, e.g. appropriate chamfering to guide insertion, passive compliant devices. The remote centre compliance RCC device is the most commonly used passive compliant device. For example, an RCC device can be used to assemble a peg into a hole a problem which confounds robots in normal operation due to position uncertainties causing linear and angular misalignment by providing some sprung movement parallel to the surface into which the peg is being inserted. However, in circumstances where operation is required whilst applying desired forces and within the constraints arbitrarily varying the position and orientation of the tool, such solutions are inadequate. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Assembly Automation Emerald Publishing

DEVELOPING ACTIVE COMPLIANCE ROBOT ARMS

Assembly Automation , Volume 12 (3): 2 – Mar 1, 1992

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0144-5154
DOI
10.1108/eb004366
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A large subset of operations in which robotic arms have consistently failed to achieve their potential are those which require the robot to interact with the environment e.g. assembly, drilling, fettling. Such tasks require force control or active compliance to either control or limit the interactions. Some of these problems can be circumvented by clever mechanical design, e.g. appropriate chamfering to guide insertion, passive compliant devices. The remote centre compliance RCC device is the most commonly used passive compliant device. For example, an RCC device can be used to assemble a peg into a hole a problem which confounds robots in normal operation due to position uncertainties causing linear and angular misalignment by providing some sprung movement parallel to the surface into which the peg is being inserted. However, in circumstances where operation is required whilst applying desired forces and within the constraints arbitrarily varying the position and orientation of the tool, such solutions are inadequate.

Journal

Assembly AutomationEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 1, 1992

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