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Developing a corporate learning strategy

Developing a corporate learning strategy Corporate learning is at a crossroads. Existing courses and facilities are nearing the end of their useful lives, and there are new learning approaches and technologies to consider. A survey of the corporate learning plans and priorities of 69 organisations suggests there is widespread confusion and a lack of direction. Many courses are excessively general and fail to address particular requirements. The focus is overwhelmingly internal and on organisational needs. Individual aspirations and the requirements of customers and business partners are being overlooked. Existing information and knowledge are being shared, but training and development activities are contributing little to the creation and exploitation of new knowledge and intellectual capital. Opportunities for collaboration are being missed. In many companies training and development remain a cost although they could provide the basis for generating new income streams and become a significant business in their own right. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Industrial and Commercial Training Emerald Publishing

Developing a corporate learning strategy

Industrial and Commercial Training , Volume 32 (3): 5 – Jun 1, 2000

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 MCB UP Ltd. All rights reserved.
ISSN
0019-7858
DOI
10.1108/00197850010381232
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Corporate learning is at a crossroads. Existing courses and facilities are nearing the end of their useful lives, and there are new learning approaches and technologies to consider. A survey of the corporate learning plans and priorities of 69 organisations suggests there is widespread confusion and a lack of direction. Many courses are excessively general and fail to address particular requirements. The focus is overwhelmingly internal and on organisational needs. Individual aspirations and the requirements of customers and business partners are being overlooked. Existing information and knowledge are being shared, but training and development activities are contributing little to the creation and exploitation of new knowledge and intellectual capital. Opportunities for collaboration are being missed. In many companies training and development remain a cost although they could provide the basis for generating new income streams and become a significant business in their own right.

Journal

Industrial and Commercial TrainingEmerald Publishing

Published: Jun 1, 2000

Keywords: Corporate strategy; Knowledge management; Learning

References