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Designations and consumer perceptions

Designations and consumer perceptions Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the labeling and denominations of olive oils and to examine to what extent these factors confuse consumers. Specifically, the authors analyze the extent to which the different denominations of olive oil prevent consumers from distinguishing among the types of olive oil. Furthermore, the authors analyze whether the current generic names of olive oil affect consumer perceptions regarding the product’s various qualities and characteristics. Design/methodology/approach – The authors performed an experiment with 128 participants divided into two groups (experimental n =64 and control n =64). In the pretest, participants completed a survey with 12 terms related to olive oil. The experimental group was then trained in the meaning of each term, after which the group returned to complete the same survey. Findings – The authors can confirm H1 and H2 . Results show that there is no clear knowledge regarding some of these terms. Social implications – This study provides positive implications to both consumers, providing them a clear information, and producers and marketers, helping distinguish in the market olive oils of more quality. Originality/value – This paper is pioneer in the literature. The authors provide a number of proposals and amendments regarding olive oil names to improve the knowledge and clarity of olive oil with direct implications for agricultural policy. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Food Journal Emerald Publishing

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0007-070X
DOI
10.1108/BFJ-06-2013-0152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze the labeling and denominations of olive oils and to examine to what extent these factors confuse consumers. Specifically, the authors analyze the extent to which the different denominations of olive oil prevent consumers from distinguishing among the types of olive oil. Furthermore, the authors analyze whether the current generic names of olive oil affect consumer perceptions regarding the product’s various qualities and characteristics. Design/methodology/approach – The authors performed an experiment with 128 participants divided into two groups (experimental n =64 and control n =64). In the pretest, participants completed a survey with 12 terms related to olive oil. The experimental group was then trained in the meaning of each term, after which the group returned to complete the same survey. Findings – The authors can confirm H1 and H2 . Results show that there is no clear knowledge regarding some of these terms. Social implications – This study provides positive implications to both consumers, providing them a clear information, and producers and marketers, helping distinguish in the market olive oils of more quality. Originality/value – This paper is pioneer in the literature. The authors provide a number of proposals and amendments regarding olive oil names to improve the knowledge and clarity of olive oil with direct implications for agricultural policy.

Journal

British Food JournalEmerald Publishing

Published: Mar 2, 2015

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