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Design for Six Sigma and Lean Product Development : Differences, Similarities and Links

Design for Six Sigma and Lean Product Development : Differences, Similarities and Links Many practitioners strive to increase the efficiency of their product development. In addition, smaller companies must satisfy customers’ expectations of their product development. These expectations can be e.g. use of specific methodologies such as Lean Product Development (LPD) and/or Design for Six Sigma (DFSS). This study attempts to identify differences and similarities between these methodologies and the connection between them. This comparison is of interest to practitioners that must choose a strategy for their product development as well as to researchers. The aim of both methodologies is to reduce waste and time of development and to raise the quality of a product at the very roots of the product: its development. LPD and DFSS help development managers to structure projects and focus as much as possible on customer expectations and satisfaction. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Journal on Quality Emerald Publishing

Design for Six Sigma and Lean Product Development : Differences, Similarities and Links

Asian Journal on Quality , Volume 8 (3): 12 – Dec 18, 2007

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1598-2688
DOI
10.1108/15982688200700023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Many practitioners strive to increase the efficiency of their product development. In addition, smaller companies must satisfy customers’ expectations of their product development. These expectations can be e.g. use of specific methodologies such as Lean Product Development (LPD) and/or Design for Six Sigma (DFSS). This study attempts to identify differences and similarities between these methodologies and the connection between them. This comparison is of interest to practitioners that must choose a strategy for their product development as well as to researchers. The aim of both methodologies is to reduce waste and time of development and to raise the quality of a product at the very roots of the product: its development. LPD and DFSS help development managers to structure projects and focus as much as possible on customer expectations and satisfaction.

Journal

Asian Journal on QualityEmerald Publishing

Published: Dec 18, 2007

Keywords: DFSS; Lean; LPD; Product development; Six Sigma

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