Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Design Ethics

Design Ethics Aircraft Engineering TH E MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXVI No 306 AUGUST 1954 it is expendable. Between this and the passenger-carrying airliner there appear to be infinite gradations of service life which offer a W E well remember how a speaker at a conference held in wide variety of desiderata in strength for the designer. If the philo­ 1935 to discuss the organization of research in relation to sophy of this theory is to be fully developed it would seem that all the needs of industry electrified his audience by suggesting types of aeroplane should be classified according to their expectation that it was quite fantastic to produce engines for military aeroplanes of life and stressed and the materials for them chosen accordingly. designed to have a service life of thousands of hours. It would be far better, and more realistic, he argued, to face the fact that the Comparative Longevity rate of casualties in wartime would be such that any individual engine could only have a life of a few hours—or a few hundred M R TURNER states, for example, that the life of the fighter aero­ plane, which is obviously at one end of the scale, is 'known to be hours at most. If the engines were designed on this basis and those short even in peacetime'; without going into the intriguing details of which survived the perils of war automatically withdrawn and the average life of these aircraft. We then come, in considering scrapped when the end of the short life for which they were designed military types, to bombers. We do not know what the comparative was nearing it would put an entirely new conception on the whole theory of engine design. Every part could be very much more expectation of life between the two types is in wartime but in peace­ time we imagine that the bomber must continue in service for a highly stressed, the power stepped up to undreamed-of heights and much longer period—approaching, we would hazard a guess, that in consequence the Royal Air Force equipped with aeroplanes of of the airliner and perhaps only limited by obsolescence. In between infinitely higher performance. surely will come the trainer. Here, however, there arises a difficulty. Apart from specially designed trainers, it has been common practice to turn a fighter into a trainer by modifying it to carry a second A Flashback occupant. These will obviously, according to the new design philo­ So far as we remember the idea did not receive much support and sophy, have been so treated in the design stage as only to have the short we cannot recall any serious suggestion that it should be put into life of the fighter and this will have to be borne in mind when they practice—though, in parenthesis, the Armstrong-Siddeley Viper come into service as trainers and the necessity of withdrawing them embodies the conception for the special purpose of powering a from service at the appropriate time remembered. pilotless target aeroplane. Nonetheless, we cannot help being re­ Presumably in cases where the life is intended to be short an minded of it on reading M R F. TURNER'S paper on the service life of entirely different approach will be made to the question of vibration. aircraft structures, which is reproduced in this issue by courtesy of There would, obviously, be no need to choose materials or give the the Editor of Saab Sonics, from which journal it is reproduced. necessary strength to components to make them capable of standing Indeed, allowing for the exaggeration of the earlier speaker, the up to untold millions of reversals when, ex hypothesis they will only theme is, at root, surely the same. M R TURNER writes of 'the idea of be called upon to withstand a few thousand of such experiences. designing for a limited useful life. The expected life of military Here again, however, we meet a phenomenon which complicates the aircraft, especially fighters, is known to be short even in peacetime. issue in flutter. This fact can be exploited to save weight or simplify production, providing due care is exercised and no unreasonable risks are taken.' Here indeed the wheel has turned full circle, and for a somewhat Specialization in Designers different reason the same philosophy of design is advocated. It would seem, if the suggestion really takes root, that the present specialization of firms and their design staffs—which on the whole tend to concentrate on one type, say bomber or fighter, to the exclu­ The Deciding Factor sion of others—will become accentuated and at the outset of his career The crux of the matter is, of course, what constitute 'due care' and our earnest embryo designer will in the one case devote his energies 'unreasonable risks'. to the consideration of a short life and a gay one, while another, The limiting factor is the human pilot, in the case of military possessed one likes to think of a more placid disposition, will be machines with which the paper is primarily concerned. Without the drawn towards designing for maturity. Where the two seem likely necessity for safeguarding him we arrive at the guided missile. This to meet is, of course, when they both have to envisage the prospect is only intended to have a life of a few minutes at the end of which of the flight of their products at high altitudes. S.B.A.C . DISPLAY • SEPTEMBER 6—12 • STAND NO. 198 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology Emerald Publishing

Design Ethics

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology , Volume 26 (8): 1 – Aug 1, 1954

Loading next page...
 
/lp/emerald-publishing/design-ethics-Ja8aU20OwD
Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © Emerald Group Publishing Limited
ISSN
0002-2667
DOI
10.1108/eb032453
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aircraft Engineering TH E MONTHLY ORGAN OF THE AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING PROFESSION VOL XXVI No 306 AUGUST 1954 it is expendable. Between this and the passenger-carrying airliner there appear to be infinite gradations of service life which offer a W E well remember how a speaker at a conference held in wide variety of desiderata in strength for the designer. If the philo­ 1935 to discuss the organization of research in relation to sophy of this theory is to be fully developed it would seem that all the needs of industry electrified his audience by suggesting types of aeroplane should be classified according to their expectation that it was quite fantastic to produce engines for military aeroplanes of life and stressed and the materials for them chosen accordingly. designed to have a service life of thousands of hours. It would be far better, and more realistic, he argued, to face the fact that the Comparative Longevity rate of casualties in wartime would be such that any individual engine could only have a life of a few hours—or a few hundred M R TURNER states, for example, that the life of the fighter aero­ plane, which is obviously at one end of the scale, is 'known to be hours at most. If the engines were designed on this basis and those short even in peacetime'; without going into the intriguing details of which survived the perils of war automatically withdrawn and the average life of these aircraft. We then come, in considering scrapped when the end of the short life for which they were designed military types, to bombers. We do not know what the comparative was nearing it would put an entirely new conception on the whole theory of engine design. Every part could be very much more expectation of life between the two types is in wartime but in peace­ time we imagine that the bomber must continue in service for a highly stressed, the power stepped up to undreamed-of heights and much longer period—approaching, we would hazard a guess, that in consequence the Royal Air Force equipped with aeroplanes of of the airliner and perhaps only limited by obsolescence. In between infinitely higher performance. surely will come the trainer. Here, however, there arises a difficulty. Apart from specially designed trainers, it has been common practice to turn a fighter into a trainer by modifying it to carry a second A Flashback occupant. These will obviously, according to the new design philo­ So far as we remember the idea did not receive much support and sophy, have been so treated in the design stage as only to have the short we cannot recall any serious suggestion that it should be put into life of the fighter and this will have to be borne in mind when they practice—though, in parenthesis, the Armstrong-Siddeley Viper come into service as trainers and the necessity of withdrawing them embodies the conception for the special purpose of powering a from service at the appropriate time remembered. pilotless target aeroplane. Nonetheless, we cannot help being re­ Presumably in cases where the life is intended to be short an minded of it on reading M R F. TURNER'S paper on the service life of entirely different approach will be made to the question of vibration. aircraft structures, which is reproduced in this issue by courtesy of There would, obviously, be no need to choose materials or give the the Editor of Saab Sonics, from which journal it is reproduced. necessary strength to components to make them capable of standing Indeed, allowing for the exaggeration of the earlier speaker, the up to untold millions of reversals when, ex hypothesis they will only theme is, at root, surely the same. M R TURNER writes of 'the idea of be called upon to withstand a few thousand of such experiences. designing for a limited useful life. The expected life of military Here again, however, we meet a phenomenon which complicates the aircraft, especially fighters, is known to be short even in peacetime. issue in flutter. This fact can be exploited to save weight or simplify production, providing due care is exercised and no unreasonable risks are taken.' Here indeed the wheel has turned full circle, and for a somewhat Specialization in Designers different reason the same philosophy of design is advocated. It would seem, if the suggestion really takes root, that the present specialization of firms and their design staffs—which on the whole tend to concentrate on one type, say bomber or fighter, to the exclu­ The Deciding Factor sion of others—will become accentuated and at the outset of his career The crux of the matter is, of course, what constitute 'due care' and our earnest embryo designer will in the one case devote his energies 'unreasonable risks'. to the consideration of a short life and a gay one, while another, The limiting factor is the human pilot, in the case of military possessed one likes to think of a more placid disposition, will be machines with which the paper is primarily concerned. Without the drawn towards designing for maturity. Where the two seem likely necessity for safeguarding him we arrive at the guided missile. This to meet is, of course, when they both have to envisage the prospect is only intended to have a life of a few minutes at the end of which of the flight of their products at high altitudes. S.B.A.C . DISPLAY • SEPTEMBER 6—12 • STAND NO. 198

Journal

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Aug 1, 1954

There are no references for this article.