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Degumming silk by CO2 supercritical fluid and their dyeing ability with plant indigo

Degumming silk by CO2 supercritical fluid and their dyeing ability with plant indigo Dyeing process is usually to blame negatively for deteriorating the environment. Eco-friendly silk fibers are able to exercising their commercial values well followed by eco-friendly processing. One of the supporting examples is the process of changing the colors of silk fabrics. This would include the dyeing process used to change the colors of silk fabric. The intention of the study is to reach the goal of creating an eco-friendly finishing process using a local natural plant-based indigo dyeing process that would complement an eco-friendly degumming process. Currently, most dye houses use sodium hydrosulfite (Na2S2O4) and alkali (NaOH) as the substances for providing hydrogen as a reducing agent. Since the sodium hydroxide by-products are acidic, they may damage equipment in the dye houses, generate air pollution in working environment. The other problems associated with the use of sodium hydrosulfite are the cost and instability with low storage.Design/methodology/approachThis paper is based on continuing improvements to the commercialization of the raw materials via the innovative degumming process elaborated in the author’s previous study: “Degumming of Silk Fibers by CO2 Supercritical Fluid.” The initial study has already proved that it was possible to remove sericin from raw silk fiber by using an organic acid pretreatment and CO2 supercritical fluid over the heavy processes the industry currently deploys. The sericin removed from this innovative and eco-friendly processing of silk fiber will be remained in a clean state, not in the form of waste via the existing technologies in use. Clean sericin, rich in silk protein with high market values, can be a potentially perfect substitute of collagen the medical and cosmetic industries widely use. The continued research is focused on the other by-product coming out from this eco-friendly degumming process the silk fibers post degumming. Dyeing process is usually to blame negatively for deteriorating the environment. Eco-friendly silk fibers are able to exercising their commercial values well followed by eco-friendly processing. One of the supporting examples is the process of changing the colors of silk fabrics. This would include the dyeing process used to change the colors of silk fabric. The intention of the study is to reach the goal of creating an eco-friendly finishing process using a local natural plant-based indigo dyeing process that would complement an eco-friendly degumming process.FindingsDegumming is an important stage in the silk manufacturing. Due to removing sericin from silk fibers, when subjected the degumming process, these silk fibers acquire the properties, which are of high consumer and commercial values, those include gloss, perfect color, soft handle and texture, elegant drape. Another purpose for the silk fabric degumming is preparing for the next step in processing, such as dyeing or printing. The author has developed a new approach to the degumming process exploiting a supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and found it as a good alternative to the conventional methods that are currently used in industry. Silk fabrics treated by the scCO2 degumming process are characterized by improved dyeing ability or color strength, while this process does not adversely affect the environment. The implications or potential applications of the findings: as it is clearly seen from Table 1, the effectiveness of the degumming process can be improved by at least 38% applying scCO2. Moreover, implementation of the scCO2 silk degumming process into the textile industry may help manufactures to consume less water and energy resources (Elmaaty and Abd El-Aziz, 2017), as well as to obtain pure sericin as a valuable end-product that can be used in the medical and cosmetic industries.Research limitations/implicationsThe innovation and novel aspects of research: degumming is an important stage in the silk manufacturing. Due to removing sericin from silk fibers, when subjected the degumming process, these silk fibers acquire the properties, which are of high consumer and commercial values, those include gloss, perfect color, soft handle and texture, elegant drape. Another purpose for the silk fabric degumming is preparing for the next step in processing, such as dyeing or printing. The author has developed a new approach to the degumming process exploiting a supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and found it as a good alternative to the conventional methods that are currently used in industry. Silk fabrics treated by the scCO2 degumming process are characterized by improved dyeing ability or color strength, while this process does not adversely affect the environment.Practical implicationsThe author has developed a new approach to the degumming process exploiting a supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and found it as a good alternative to the conventional methods that are currently used in industry. Silk fabrics treated by the scCO2 degumming process are characterized by improved dyeing ability or color strength, while this process does not adversely affect the environment.Social implicationsAs it is clearly seen from Table 1, the effectiveness of the degumming process can be improved by at least 38% applying scCO2. Moreover, implementation of the scCO2 silk degumming process into the textile industry may help manufacturers to consume less water and energy resources (Elmaaty and Abd El-Aziz, 2017), as well as to obtain pure sericin as a valuable end-product that can be used in the medical and cosmetic industries.Originality/valueTo make the silk manufacturing more green, the author has developed a technology for obtaining a plant-based indigo dye applying only locally grown agricultural products. The author has found that banana paste and banana peel paste have a sufficiently enough reduction potential for converting the indigo dye into indigo white, which is an important stage in the dyeing processes. The investigation performed showed that both these pastes can serve as a green alternative to sodium hydrosulfite, widely used in industry as a reducing agent. The main result of this study is the demonstration that natural, recyclable and easily biodegradable resources can be exploited to produce the semi-products for the textile industry and the final dyed silk fabrics as well. Summarizing the above, it can be concluded that we have got the results, which show promising alternative green processes for the textile industry in silk treatment (both degumming and dyeing). Their implementation may turn the silk textile production into a sustainable green circle and economically viable manufacturer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology Emerald Publishing

Degumming silk by CO2 supercritical fluid and their dyeing ability with plant indigo

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Publisher
Emerald Publishing
Copyright
© Emerald Publishing Limited
ISSN
0955-6222
DOI
10.1108/ijcst-06-2019-0072
Publisher site
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Abstract

Dyeing process is usually to blame negatively for deteriorating the environment. Eco-friendly silk fibers are able to exercising their commercial values well followed by eco-friendly processing. One of the supporting examples is the process of changing the colors of silk fabrics. This would include the dyeing process used to change the colors of silk fabric. The intention of the study is to reach the goal of creating an eco-friendly finishing process using a local natural plant-based indigo dyeing process that would complement an eco-friendly degumming process. Currently, most dye houses use sodium hydrosulfite (Na2S2O4) and alkali (NaOH) as the substances for providing hydrogen as a reducing agent. Since the sodium hydroxide by-products are acidic, they may damage equipment in the dye houses, generate air pollution in working environment. The other problems associated with the use of sodium hydrosulfite are the cost and instability with low storage.Design/methodology/approachThis paper is based on continuing improvements to the commercialization of the raw materials via the innovative degumming process elaborated in the author’s previous study: “Degumming of Silk Fibers by CO2 Supercritical Fluid.” The initial study has already proved that it was possible to remove sericin from raw silk fiber by using an organic acid pretreatment and CO2 supercritical fluid over the heavy processes the industry currently deploys. The sericin removed from this innovative and eco-friendly processing of silk fiber will be remained in a clean state, not in the form of waste via the existing technologies in use. Clean sericin, rich in silk protein with high market values, can be a potentially perfect substitute of collagen the medical and cosmetic industries widely use. The continued research is focused on the other by-product coming out from this eco-friendly degumming process the silk fibers post degumming. Dyeing process is usually to blame negatively for deteriorating the environment. Eco-friendly silk fibers are able to exercising their commercial values well followed by eco-friendly processing. One of the supporting examples is the process of changing the colors of silk fabrics. This would include the dyeing process used to change the colors of silk fabric. The intention of the study is to reach the goal of creating an eco-friendly finishing process using a local natural plant-based indigo dyeing process that would complement an eco-friendly degumming process.FindingsDegumming is an important stage in the silk manufacturing. Due to removing sericin from silk fibers, when subjected the degumming process, these silk fibers acquire the properties, which are of high consumer and commercial values, those include gloss, perfect color, soft handle and texture, elegant drape. Another purpose for the silk fabric degumming is preparing for the next step in processing, such as dyeing or printing. The author has developed a new approach to the degumming process exploiting a supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and found it as a good alternative to the conventional methods that are currently used in industry. Silk fabrics treated by the scCO2 degumming process are characterized by improved dyeing ability or color strength, while this process does not adversely affect the environment. The implications or potential applications of the findings: as it is clearly seen from Table 1, the effectiveness of the degumming process can be improved by at least 38% applying scCO2. Moreover, implementation of the scCO2 silk degumming process into the textile industry may help manufactures to consume less water and energy resources (Elmaaty and Abd El-Aziz, 2017), as well as to obtain pure sericin as a valuable end-product that can be used in the medical and cosmetic industries.Research limitations/implicationsThe innovation and novel aspects of research: degumming is an important stage in the silk manufacturing. Due to removing sericin from silk fibers, when subjected the degumming process, these silk fibers acquire the properties, which are of high consumer and commercial values, those include gloss, perfect color, soft handle and texture, elegant drape. Another purpose for the silk fabric degumming is preparing for the next step in processing, such as dyeing or printing. The author has developed a new approach to the degumming process exploiting a supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and found it as a good alternative to the conventional methods that are currently used in industry. Silk fabrics treated by the scCO2 degumming process are characterized by improved dyeing ability or color strength, while this process does not adversely affect the environment.Practical implicationsThe author has developed a new approach to the degumming process exploiting a supercritical fluid carbon dioxide and found it as a good alternative to the conventional methods that are currently used in industry. Silk fabrics treated by the scCO2 degumming process are characterized by improved dyeing ability or color strength, while this process does not adversely affect the environment.Social implicationsAs it is clearly seen from Table 1, the effectiveness of the degumming process can be improved by at least 38% applying scCO2. Moreover, implementation of the scCO2 silk degumming process into the textile industry may help manufacturers to consume less water and energy resources (Elmaaty and Abd El-Aziz, 2017), as well as to obtain pure sericin as a valuable end-product that can be used in the medical and cosmetic industries.Originality/valueTo make the silk manufacturing more green, the author has developed a technology for obtaining a plant-based indigo dye applying only locally grown agricultural products. The author has found that banana paste and banana peel paste have a sufficiently enough reduction potential for converting the indigo dye into indigo white, which is an important stage in the dyeing processes. The investigation performed showed that both these pastes can serve as a green alternative to sodium hydrosulfite, widely used in industry as a reducing agent. The main result of this study is the demonstration that natural, recyclable and easily biodegradable resources can be exploited to produce the semi-products for the textile industry and the final dyed silk fabrics as well. Summarizing the above, it can be concluded that we have got the results, which show promising alternative green processes for the textile industry in silk treatment (both degumming and dyeing). Their implementation may turn the silk textile production into a sustainable green circle and economically viable manufacturer.

Journal

International Journal of Clothing Science and TechnologyEmerald Publishing

Published: Apr 29, 2021

Keywords: Silk; Sericin; Degumming; CO2 supercritical fluid; Indigo; Dyeing; Sustainable; Environment; Processing; Reducing agent; Economy; Textile industry

References